Monthly Writing Memo: 5 types of Heroes

Welcome to the first Monthly Writing Memo! So for my own blog, Author the World, I’ve been thinking about doing a post about villains. As those of you who have been following know, I’ve been studying horror as I work on my horror film script. During this process, I’ve been wondering about the different types of villains, which in turn made me wonder about the different types of heroes in stories. So for this Month’s Writing Memo, I thought I’d do a post about heroes, and then later this week my post on villains will be up on Author the World.

In general, I think all heroes can really be broken down into a few main types, and every hero in a story usually falls into one of them. The way I’ve divided them up is by what motivates them rather than what they specifically do, or how they go about being a hero.

  1. The Savior –

The Savior is someone who actively tries to be a hero. They want to help people and save the day, so they seek out ways they can do this. The most obvious example of this is many superhero stories where characters like Superman or Spiderman actively seek out those in danger to help them. These characters do it solely because they want to help people and be a hero. Some want recognition, some want the satisfaction of saving people, but either way the thing that drives them is the need to be the hero. It’s a compulsion almost, and when they don’t just help when they see someone in danger, they actively seek the danger (and the victims) out.

  1. The Soldier –

The Soldier is similar to the Savior in that they feel the desire to help people, but the soldier does it out of a sense of duty and honor. That’s not to say they don’t have other motivations as well, but this character type is driven by the sense that it is their responsibility to help people, and they must take action. I think if you look at the movie “Die Hard” you’ll see John McClane fits into this character type. Yeah, he’s in the wrong place at the wrong time, but he is also a police officer and when he sees the problem he feels it is his duty to take action. Many of these character types are those military or police type characters, or have other positions that are focused on helping people in some way. Some other example jobs that a character can have to fit this role include teacher, doctor, or even counselor/therapist.

The goal of this character is to do their “job” and help people because they think it is their responsibility and duty. Maybe it can cross over into the Savior role of feeling driven to help people, but the slight distinction is where the Savior would say “I helped because they were in trouble,” the Soldier would say “I helped because it was my job/responsibility to help.”

  1. The Mercenary –

The Mercenary Hero doesn’t necessarily have to be getting paid, though some form of payment is generally the motivation for them to be the hero. They are a hero because they get something out of it. An example of this is are characters like Nicholas Cage’s character in National Treasure. That is a personal mission for him and he doesn’t do it for anyone else, he does it for largely selfish reasons—he desperately wants the truth and the excitement of discovering the treasure.

The Mercenary is driven by what he/she personally gets out of being the hero. They can be paid to do the job, they can be on a personal mission of love or vengeance or profit, but whatever it is they are being the hero because it serves them, not because they want to serve the people they are saving.

  1. The Reluctant Hero –

The Reluctant Hero is one of my favorite types of heroes to write because they don’t try to be perfect, and often try to extricate themselves from the drama, but they morally feel the urge to help when they see a situation. Unlike the Savior they won’t seek out the conflict, and unlike the Mercenary they don’t want anything for themselves, but similarly to the Soldier they feel a sense of duty.

The Reluctant Hero is someone who doesn’t want to be a hero, and they aren’t doing it because it’s their job like the Soldier. They are a person who just happens to be in the wrong place at the right time, and they morally can’t bring themselves to turn away from those in need. If asked why they helped, they would respond “I couldn’t turn my back on it, and it was the right thing to do.” They don’t feel like it’s their duty, they just feel like they were the only one there at the time who could do it, so they did.

I think the one thing that is often interesting about the Reluctant Hero is that, if someone else was around who could successfully do the saving, the Reluctant Hero would let them, but often they are put in situations where either they have to try, or all is lost.

  1. The Anti-Hero –

The final type of hero isn’t quite a hero at all – the Anti-Hero. The Anti-Hero is not someone who is trying to help anyone, and they’re most often not a good person. There are slight varying definitions of this, but in my opinion, the Anti-Hero is a character who ultimately has their own larger goal, but they do kind, heroic things along the way in pursuit of their goal. I think this falls into a lot of gangster characters who do wonderful things for the “little people” but who aren’t really good characters at all, and whose larger goals are really something quite unhero-like.

Another version of the Anti-Hero is someone who does dark, violent things in order to achieve something good. This kind of character is like Batman at times (The Dark Knight is the obvious example). Batman kills and commits crimes in order to make Gotham a better place, going from loved hero to wanted criminal.

Either way, the main thing about the Anti-hero is that they don’t follow the same rules as the normal hero, and that they will often commit villain-like acts in the pursuit of their goal. These sorts of acts will stand in stark contrast with the heroic elements, and it will make the audience question whether the character is hero or villain.

Final Notes:

I’m sure there are some more minor variations of heroes, but in general, I think most heroes in stories can be divided up into one of the five categories above. If you aren’t sure about which your character is, ask yourself what motivates them to be a hero? What motivates them to commit heroic acts? If you have that answer, you should be able to pinpoint what type of hero they are.

For my blog post on the various types of villains, stop by Author the World on Friday. Until next month, happy writing!

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3 Comments on “Monthly Writing Memo: 5 types of Heroes”

  1. Tom Johnson says:

    Most of the stories I write are about good conquering evil. They will always feature one of your heroes. For instance, The Black Ghost is an anti-hero, and is quite violent in his fight against the bad guys. While The Mind Master (see The Man In The Black Fedora) is the savior type. Others will be the reluctant hero (heroine) like my Korean character, Yo (an aide to The Black Ghost – see Carnival of Death). I’m not good at writing great villains, but my friend, John P. Cater has one of the best villains I’ve encountered in many years in his novel PI DAY DOOMSDAY. The guy literally dresses and looks like the Grim Reaper, as his flesh falls off his body and he cackles an insane laugh while planning the death of millions of people. Looking forward to your series of articles.

  2. Tom Johnson says:

    ‘Heroes and villains’ is a very interesting discussions. I write a lot of heroic stories which include the five types you mention. Good vs evil, and good always triumphs in my stories. The Black Ghost (see Carnival of Death, and others) is an anti-hero, who is very violent in his battle with the bad guys. One of his aides, a Korean girl named Yo is possibly the reluctant heroine. The Mind Master (see The Man In The Black Fedora) is the superhero type, wishing to help. Many others, like The Phantom Detective, Black Bat, Secret Agent X, and others, become heroes as a service – finding criminals the police can’t find, or can’t touch. I’m not very good with villains, but my friend, John P. Cater has a fantastic villain in PI DAY DOOMSDAY that is the best one I’ve encountered in many years. He’s dressed and looks like the Grim Reaper, and has an insane laugh as his skin falls off his body from radiation while he plans the death of millions of people. Villains just don’t get any better than that. LOL


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