Dreams come true in unexpected ways in Tim Baker’s “Living The Dream”.

Living The Dream, by Tim Baker

In Tim Baker’s first novel, Living The Dream, Kurt, a down and out plumber’s helper; Jimmy, a dishonest businessman, who is up to his ears in cheating and embezzlement; Vicky, a disheartened wife; and Danny, an easy going dive shop owner all have two things in common: they’re all having some very strange dreams and they all feel that somehow, their dreams will come true. Kurt’s dreams lead him on a very rough ride to the Florida coast to carry out a get rich quick scheme that is not even fully developed in his mind. Jimmy thinks that his dreams are telling him that the walls are closing in around him and it’s time to break away and start a new life. Vicky is dreaming of a handsome mystery man, who is everything her husband is not. Danny is dreaming of a mysterious woman, the girl of his dreams, so to speak, and he is following clues from his dreams to find her.
Their dreams do, in fact, come true, but not in the same ways as each one envisions, as they are all drawn together by circumstance, while trying to sort through the craziness of their individual dream worlds. When their lives unwittingly intermix, it is an ending for some of them and a new beginning for others, but one thing is certain. They never dreamed that it would be like this.
Readers will never be bored while reading this comical race to riches, where nothing is at it appears. No one is truly in control, although they all think that they are. It’s hard to tell the guys from the bad, at times, and you may be surprised who ends up winners in this truly entertaining tale, as they all search for riches and happiness.

You can find Living The Dream and other books by Tim Baker at Blindogg Books


So You Think You Can Dance: Breaking New Ground

Art's Visual Media Review

“What’s wrong with kids today?”

            This lament has been uttered by every generation  since Adam and Eve discovered they were pregnant a second time.

            So….what IS wrong with kids these days?

           They feel as if they have no future.  The last few extant generations simply don’t.  Futures come in handy when you feel as though the world will be unrecognizable before you’ve grown up.  As a child of The Mushroom Cloud I know what that feels like, that amputation of the future. It made me really angry.  My friends and I were more likely to commit petty crimes and indulge in drugs.  Without a future, why bother?  Why work hard in school?  Why cultivate disciplines, interests, social connections?  The oceans are rising and will drown your block or your whole neighborhood.  The coolest animals will be extinct.  No elephants, no polar bears.  What kind of future is that?

Can't Dance

            Then I discovered a TV show called “So You Think You Can Dance”.  You can knock me over with what these kids are doing!  Their bodies must be INCREDIBLY strong and flexible.  These kids are doing the impossible!  Has the human race mutated?  Do we have extra joints, super-human muscle memory? Who ARE these people?

            They’re just kids.  Their secret is that they found a passion, something that interested them so much that they said “fuck it” to the absence of the future and decided to live for this thing called Dance.  It was better than being a thug.  Thugs are mean, WAY mean and being mean doesn’t feel very good.  Not as good as practicing B-moves, Krumping, flapping, sapping, tapping, robot-twitching, water-waving, learning your body’s capabilities and stretching them further, further, further!

            This is IT!  Sometimes it’s called ART.  Don’t be embarrassed by the word ART.  It’s cool to do ART.  It’s okay.  Even if it’s gay it doesn’t matter.  Nobody cares about gay any more.  You can be gay, you can change from man to woman or woman to man, nobody cares!  If you want to know where it is, where the cutting edge in creativity can be found these days you can see it on “So You Think You Can Dance”.  The judges aren’t scary.  They aren’t there to cut you down.  They want to show you The Future.  Word up, Bro.  There IS a future.  Nobody can stop it.  It takes some work.  Everything good takes work. Making a future is hard work.  It’s not like it used to be, when the Future was going to happen no matter what.  Now it takes a little faith and a lot of work, but it’s there: you… DO…Have…A…Future.  Do you want it to kick you in the nuts or do you want to dance with it?

            When has anyone given a shit about choreoraphy?  Are you kidding?  Corey-who?  Shazam!  Choreographers are the composers of Dance.  They arrange the time-space-music continuum in which Dance exists.  On the TV show they are not only given credit, they are like stars!  Now I know the work of Tice Diorio, Mia Michaels, Sonya Tayeh, “Nappytab”, Stacey Tookey and Travis Wall.  Choreographers come from the elder population of dancers.  They still dance but they are the keepers of the flame, the mentors of the seventeen through twenty two year old dancers who are living the dreams.

            I’m not sure there is any more difficult art form than what is now appearing as Dance.  It’s not enough to specialize.  You can’t be a ballroom dancer, a hip-hopper or a Broadway hoofer.  One of the messages of So You Think You Can Dance is that you must be trained in ALL the dance styles.  Choreographers wont’ hire you if you don’t know all the styles of dance. Choreographers are the Gate Keepers, the bosses, the ones who hire dancers.  Get tight with the choreographers who work at SYTYCD and you will be employed for years to come. In time, you will become a choreographer.

            The most amazing thing about the dance numbers on this show is their purity.  We’re not seeing arrangements for pop superstars.  We’re not seeing choreography for Taylor Swift or Michael Jackson (RIP).  These dance routines are created for the television audience.  For US!  Sometimes magic happens on that stage.  Those of you who watch the show know what I mean.  In more than a decade this show has lifted the art of Dance so that each season is more amazing than the last.  The mutations continue.  Evolution is visible year to year.  Dancers get more flexible, their muscle memories become more detailed, malleable, imprintable.  This happens in front of our eyes.  Sure, it’s a TV contest show aimed at a teenage demographic.  That’s how things work.  Consider the difference between the egregious karaoke of American Idol and the drama and high art of So You Think You Can Dance.  Big difference, yeah?

            Big big difference.

       

A Midwesterner by birth, Arthur Rosch migrated to the West Coast just in time to be a hippie but discovered that he was more connected to the Beatnik generation. He harkened back to an Old School world of jazz, poetry, painting and photography. In the Eighties he received Playboy Magazine’s Best Short Story Award for a comic view of a planet where there are six genders. The timing was not good.  His life was falling apart as he struggled with addiction and depression. He experienced the reality of the streets for more than a decade. Putting himself back together was the defining experience of his life. It wasn’t easy. It did, however, nurture his literary soul. He has a passion for astronomy, photography, history, psychology and the weird puzzle of human experience. He is currently a certified Seniors Peer Counselor in Sonoma County, California. Come visit his blogs and photo sites. www.artrosch.com and http://bit.ly/2uyxZbv


 

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Ask the Authors: Character Development

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Let’s talk about developing characters. What makes them tick? What motivates them? Are they based on real people or achetypes or created from the gray matter in the writer’s head? What are they afraid of? And how do we as authors know these things? And how do we give our characters depth? Readers need to walk away from the story feeling as if the characters are whole, complex human beings, complete with personality and history. Let’s Ask the Authors about their methods for creating character, and feel free to share what works for you in the comments if you’re so inclined.

There are many methods we can use to create rich, in-depth characters, with backgrounds and histories, and belief systems ingrained from childhood. Some authors people watch and build from their observations. Others use the Proust Questionaire or similar tools to develop charaters and give them depth. A popular practice these days for bloggers to promote new releases is to interview the protagonist of the book instead of the author. I’ve never employed this practice here on Writing to be Read, but I have entertained the idea thinking it might be fun. 

What methods do you use to develop your characters?

DeAnna Knippling: I copy real people, or amalgamate real people, into a single character.  I’m trying to strip them down to one identifying “verb.”  My favorite example of a character who’s been simplified into delightfulness is Ash Williams from the Evil Dead franchise…his “verb” is “DO THE WORST POSSIBLE THING, BABY.”  Another good one is Heath Ledger’s Joker, whose “verb” might be something like, “do the thing that makes the situation not funny anymore.”  Like I said, still working on that.

Jordan Elizabeth: I’m not sure how to answer this one.  I write the first draft as the characters guide me.  Usually advanced character development happens in the editing phase.

Chris DiBella: I try to make my good guys likeable and I try to make my bad guys complete jerks. All my books have the same cast of main characters (good guys), so I want the reader to enjoy them enough to want to keep coming back for the next thirty novels I put out. I try to make them bad-asses, but also believable with how I project their characters. I also try to inject a lot of humor in my dialogue so that they appear like normal everyday folks. On the flip side, I want people to hate my antagonist so much that they actually scream out in cheer when Mercer kills them. I even get excited when I think about how I want to write their demise. It’s all just a fun part of the process.

Chris Barili: I start with a basic character triangle. What the character wants, what she needs, and her fears/faults. For shorter works, that’s all I do. For novellas or novels I’ll do a biography sheet on each major character.  That bio is four pages long when blank, and can be as long as 15 filled out. It has everything from their looks (which I often fashion after famous people) to their inner workings.

Tim Baker: My one and only method of character development is the story itself. At the beginning of the story each character (with the exception of recurring characters like Ike and Brewski) are strangers to me. I might know their basic personality but I learn about them as I write because I use their interactions with other characters, as well as their role in the story to bring out their individual personalities.

Cynthia Vespia: No matter the genre I build my characters with realistic qualities so they are more relatable to the readers.

Art Rosch: If a writer is not a psychologist (I mean one who studies human nature and matters of heart and mind, not a certified this-or-that) I’m likely to put down the book or story by said writer.  Psychology is fundamental to writing.  Where to start?  With yourself, of course.  You, in your mind/body system, are a living laboratory of human nature.  Extend your field of observation to your family, your friends, and then keep going.  We are more the same than we are different.  I’ve been helped immensely by reading psychology books.  I’m a Jungian and a great fan of James Hillman.  Jung gives us the archetypes.  We write in archetypes and flesh out our characters with individual quirks and traits.

It’s not only the protagonists that needs to be developed into a deep, rich character, but also our supporting characters. Like real people, experiences affect how the character relates to the world around them and to the other characters in the story. Characters have to have relationships and the backgrounds and histories of the minor characters plays into how these relationships function within the story. The nature of a relationship may also affect the protagonist’s actions and it need to be clear to readers why this releationship has such an effect.

Although characters with minor roles my not need to be developed as deeply as your main players, and their roles may be so minute that there’s not room to share their background with readers, we as the authors should at least have a vague idea of where each character is coming from. Backgrounds should be more detailed for the more major characters, with more of where they each are coming from being exposed to viewers.

Different methods of doing this may be dependent on the point of view(s) with which the author choses to tell the story. A Point of View (POV) offers the reader a window into a story which allows them to see a certain angle or perspective. When using a single POV, one of the drawbacks is that it is limiting, in that the reader will only know what the protagonist knows or experiences, and nothing more, which can make it difficult if you need to let readers know what the antagonist is up to. Multiple POVs, on the other hand, remedy that particular problem, but you risk getting the reader confused if you don’t make it clear who’s head we are in at all times. Let’s see if one is more popular than the other among our author panel members.

Do you prefer single or multiple POVs?

DeAnna Knippling: Depends on the story.  I do both.
Jordan Elizabeth: I love multiple POVs.  I get excited being able to explore different minds.
Carol Riggs: I much prefer single points of view. Limited ones, where the reader is locked into one character’s head throughout the novel, and no info is gained except from what that character learns. I love this setup because it’s exactly like our experiences in life—we only know our POV. It adds to a sense of mystery, with that not-knowing. I’ve thought about writing a multiple POV novel a couple of times, but I’ve actually never written one!
Chris Barili: Depends what I’m writing. Short stories are always single POV. Well, almost. I did sell one framed short story that had two POVs, and wrote another like that. Longer works, it depends. The stories in the Hell’s Butcher Series are one POV, either Frank’s for the larger books or someone else’s for t he shorter works. Smothered, my PNR novel (as B.T. Clearwater) has three points of view, one of which is a ghost. And the fantasy novel I sent to an editor this weekend has four POVs. It’s whatever works to advance the plot and make the story complete.
Tim Baker: I prefer multiple POVs. In my books I tend to write different parts of the story from the POV of one character or another. When I do – the reader only knows what that character knows. To me it’s more entertaining to learn the story at the same time the characters learn it.
Cynthia Vespia: As I’m developing a few new series I have found that multiple POV is alot more fun to write in, and it helps create a fuller world.
I think that, as our creations, our writings are a part of us. After all, everything we write has a little bit of ourselves in it. Whether we base your characters on real life people that we know, or invent them in our minds from the depths of our imaginations, they are bound to have traits in common with their creator. Let’s see what our author panel thinks.
Have you created any of your characters based on people who you know in real life?
DeAnna Knippling: All the time 🙂
Jordan Elizabeth:  Oma from Goat Children is the character most closely based on a real person.  She is my maternal grandmother personified.  (Goat Children is about a girl caring for her grandmother, who has dementia.  I based much of it off my real life experiences.)
 
Janet Garber: I take the 5th. Seriously, most characters are a blend or composite of people or I use some characteristic of their lives and take off from there.
I like to start with a person I know slightly or not at all  and make up a fantastic backstory. I did this with the wife of my husband’s work colleague – took a few details from her real life and embellished like crazy. I’ve been praying ever since that she won’t get her hands on this story! More recently after spending time with my 95 year old mother, I turned her into a character who decides to try online dating. At her age. And meets with success of a kind. I took care to describe a young relative in another story and made up a story of the rest of her life. Most often, I use elements of a living person as a starting point.
Carol Riggs: Sure! But not exactly like them. I just borrow a trait, whether a physical look or an attitude or so on. Like I see someone walking down the street with a certain gait, or I notice someone has allergies and is breathing through his mouth because his nose is stuffed up. Even something as simple as someone’s unusual name or my first high school crush’s name as a tribute to him. Real life is great fodder for spicing up my characters and making them more real.
 
Chris DiBella: I tend to use a lot of people I know in real life as references for my characters, and I even use the actual names of those people in the books. My two biggest examples of this are Pat Vigil and Tim Baker. Pat was my best friend in real life. He passed away unexpectedly a few years back and I was having a rough time dealing with losing him. At the time, I didn’t have a partner for my main character, so I just wrote Patrick in as that character. I decided to write him exactly how he was in real life. So every smart-mouthed reply or gesture he makes is how he would act if he was in those circumstances. It’s my way of honoring my friend and keeping him alive in the books. The parts about him always being the person I counted on for anything is also true, and even though he’s a snarky guy with a comeback for everything, he was the one friend I knew would come running no matter what I needed him for.
Chris Barili: Yes, both intentionally and unintentionally.
Art Rosch: Are you kidding?  Of course I have. See my answer on methods of development. I’ve portrayed my family and invented an extra sibling who is something of a composite with my sister’s qualities mixed with traits that are far more malignant.  It wasn’t difficult to turn my mother into a villain.  She was the kind of person who made everyone else miserable.  This is how I define evil: someone who escapes pain by transmitting it to other people.  My poor mom is gone now, so I can write about her with some objectivity.  What writer doesn’t use the human material, the people who populate his or her world?
Have you created characters from archetypes?
DeAnna Knippling: Meh.  I think archetypes are looking at character from a reader/critic’s point of view.  What makes an archetype an archetype and how do you write that?  Far more interesting.
 
Jordan Elizabeth: Not that I can think of.
Chris Barili: No, but after catching a class on that by Rebecca Moesta and Chris Mandeville at Superstars Writing Seminars, I plan to try it.
Tim Baker: I try to avoid this at all costs. I want my characters to ring true as real people. I don’t like clichés.
Art Rosch: Oh.  Again, see my answer on methods of development.  Looks like an archetype.  Feels like an archetype.  Smells like an archetype.  Has the texture of an archetype.  Good thing we didn’t step in it. (this is an old joke, one that I find very funny.  One of the other funniest things I’ve seen is the cartoon of two Indians (native Americans) walking in the desert.  A huge mushroom cloud is growing on the horizon.  One guy looks at the other and says: “It’s for you.”
It looks like archetypes aren’t very popular with these authors. Only Art Rosch admits to using archetypes in character development. In my studies I learned that archetypes are there, even when we don’t purposefully use them. I’ve found that some stories lend themselves to more obvious archetypes. While my Playground for the Gods series is science fantasy, encompassing world mythologies, it lends itself to the obvious use of archetypes. It is non stretch to see Enki as the trickster or to identify Inanna’s hero’s journey. While Delilah‘s hero’s journey may be a little less obvious, it is there, non-the-less. Every story has a hero and a villian, which are both archetypes, but it seems not all authors conciously set out to use them.
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This quote found on “It’s All About the Words. http://pjbraley.com/writers-words/writers-writing/january/

Anything we write which we have passion reflects that passion in the writing, the thoughts and opinions expressed coming from within ourselves. It’s inevitable, unless we’re writing ad copy or technical manuals. How can we expect to not inject at least a little of ourselves into our chacaters?
This post has me thinking about these things, and it occurred to me that Delilah is like my alter-ego. Delilah is tough and gritty and she she never fails to stand up for what she believes is right. She faces down outlaws and lynch mobs without showing the face of fear. She’s all the things I wish I was, but can’t be, at least not in polite society. Let’s see how our panel members see it. 
Do you have traits in common with any of your characters?
DeAnna Knippling: Sometimes.  More often it’s just that I empathize with them.  I have one character that I based on myself, for a series I don’t have out yet.  THAT was a weird writing experience, let me tell you.
Jordan Elizabeth: There is one character in a manuscript not yet published who I based strongly off of me.  Critique partners hated her!  They kept commenting on her flaws and they were things I do.  It was embarrassing! Since then I’ve tried to improve myself by being less like that character.
Janet Garber: 5th again!
Carol Riggs: There’s likely a little bit of me in every one of my characters. Although it’s awfully fun to write characters who are different from me in some way—more bolder, reckless, daring, and adventurous. They do things I wouldn’t have the personality or interest for. I can live vicariously through them. Even so, they still have basics that I value: a caring for others, a willingness to sacrifice for a greater cause, and a spirit that will get back up again and try again even after it’s been broken and stomped on.
Chris DiBella: I keep the answer to this question heavily guarded, and my wife is the only one who knows the answer with all the juicy details, so when you do an “Ask The Authors Wives” segment, perhaps this will be revealed…
(Kaye: You know Chris, that’s not a bad idea. Hmmm….)
Chris Barili: Of course. Anyone who says they don’t is lying. If nothing else, our characters pick up traits from us as writers the instant we put them on paper. I do have a woman with Parkinson’s as a character in a PNR novella I’m currently writing, though.
Tim Baker: People have asked me quite often, “which character in your books is the most like you?” I always give the same answer…”There is a little bit of me in all of my characters. How could there not be?”
Art Rosch: In my autobiographical novel, Confessions of an Honest Man, I have a character whom I love very much.  He is the jazz saxophonist Zoot Prestige.  He is Aaron Kantro’s mentor and  he knows enough about Aaron’s struggles during childhood to anticipate that Aaron is heading for difficult times. He admonishes his young friend.  He tells him “Ask for help when you feel overwhelmed.  You can’t get out of a crisis by yourself.  Remember what I’m telling you, ’cause I don’t like to give advice.  People who give advice are boring.  Just remember…when you feel like you’ve hit bottom, ask for help.” Aaron is a surrogate for myself.  I did ask for help.  And I found it.
Characters, especially your protagonist, must take action in order for the story to move forward. In order to take action, charactors must have some type of motivation. Motivation can come in many forms, usually an obstacle to be overcome. External obstacles such as nature, illness, or the institution must be tackled, but your character still needs to have some sort of inner motivation to take on the job.
The character’s flaws or fears are the basis for all character motivation. I mean think about it, if the character has a secret or a flaw they wish to keep hidden, it can be a motivator. Fear of what might happen may prompt a chacter to take action to avoid a negative outcome, whether that outcome is not being eaten by the monster, avoiding a punishment from the law or their parents or holding on to the love they’re afraid of losing. But, if you get right down to it, it’s not really the secret that motivates the character to action, but the fear of discovery that prompts them to do something about the situation.
What kinds of fears or flaws do you give your characters?
DeAnna Knippling: I love having characters who have blind spots, like the character who has issues due to PTSD remembering exactly who a serial killer was, because he was tortured by same, or the little girl who doesn’t have a lot of empathy until she’s experienced a situation or seen the consequences herself–and ends up hurting her friends.  I used to want to be a psychologist when I grew up, so there’s a wide variety of mental things going on with my characters.
Jordan Elizabeth: I try not to make my characters clumsy.  That feels overdone in YA literature.  I aim for emotional insecurities that they can overcome to be stronger at the end.
Tim Baker: I try to make my characters as “real” as possible. I give them whatever fears and flaws are necessary to fit the story. In other words I won’t disclose that a character has a fear of spiders if it isn’t relevant to the plot. I also trey to do the same thing with their flaws – without getting to cliché…you know, the alcoholic ex-cop bent on revenge…or the egomaniac villain stroking his white cat. Like I said – I try to keep it real!
Margareth Stewart: The main character usually takes the lead in actions, writing tone, and pace of the narrative. I give my characters autonomy to be doing so. This is something I have been trying to work out more and more with – the matching of the narrative and the main voice within the plot. If it´s a young girl in her thirties using slang and never settling down, the pace of the novel should be like that, too. That is in my new thriller Zero Chance. In Open/Pierre´s journey after war, for instance, I have crafted Pierre in slow motion, in pain, also moving slowly in time and space, and the narrative follows that way, too. So actually, it is all about giving the main character: the voice, the narrative, and the POV. I get a little tense if readers are going to understand that, anyway it´s how I have been working work my novels out.
Cynthia Vespia: Again, I like to base my characters in reality. That means giving them flaws and fears. The more rich development you can give to a character, the more the reader can identify with them.
Art Rosch: We all fear the same things.  We fear illness, pain, poverty, failure, loneliness.  Some of us fear death.  I’m not particularly afraid of death but I’m terrified by the processes that will inevitably take me there.  When I passed sixty five years I began a more intense conversation with death.  It changes things.  I transfer these emotions into my characters.  That’s what writers do.  We personify our feelings through the tools of literature.  I’ve noted that it’s much easier to identify with a flawed character.  People with addictions and weaknesses are much more approachable, they give us a warm and cuddly sensation.  Who loves perfect people?  High achievers give me the creeps.  I prefer characters who eat too many cookies in bed….or maybe have an appetite for substances….or maybe talk too much…you know…human beings.  In The Shadow Storm I have a world leader who is afflicted with bi-polar disorder.  It proves to be his un-doing.  The only characters who have no flaws are the villains.  Sometimes a villain can achieve an icy smoothness which is impenetrable.  There’s no way to approach a character like that.

Some authors claim that their characters come alive and not only talk to them, but take control of pen or keyboard and guide the scene in directions the author never expected. I personally experienced this while writing Delilah. Whenever I’d get stuck and not know where the story was supposed to go, I’d close my eyes and ask her, and she would make the scene unfold in my mind. And yes, there were times when the results surprised me, but the story was better for it. So, let’s ask our author panel what they think.

 

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This quote found on “It’s All About the Words” http://pjbraley.com/writers-words/writers-writing/january/

Do your characters ever do things that surprise you? Can you give an example?
DeAnna Knippling: My characters tend to annoy me.  “Oh my God, would you just stop being so…yourself?!?”  I tend not to remember specific examples because it all works out in the end, I’m just annoyed.  I have a real-life teenaged daughter, and she’s nowhere near as annoying.
 
Jordan Elizabeth: Constantly!  I never know where they will take the story.  An example I can think of is Treasure Darkly.  I didn’t expect Amethyst to play a big a role as she did, but she just kept jumping back into the scenes.
Janet Garber: My character decided to have an affair.  I was shocked. It didn’t fit in with what I knew about her, but as I wrote the scenes, I saw how it perked up the story.
Carol Riggs: Oh yes. In Bottled, my genie main character was supposed to get together with the love of her life after 1000 years of not seeing him. I imagined it in my head as this swoony and touching romantic scene. But when I got her together with her hot guy on a tropical island, they started arguing! It was really annoying. LOL After much frowning and deliberating, I decided to go with the flow and embrace the conflict.
Chris DiBella: Pat Vigil is always doing stuff that surprises me because I don’t even know what I’m going to have him say until I get to that point. I just imagine what he would have said or done in real life, and then I write it down. I’ve always been happy with the results. For example, there’s a scene in Whispering Death where the NESA team has been invited to dinner and they’re seated at a table with Thailand’s Prime Minister. The PM asks Vigil if he liked the lobster bisque, and Vigil blurts out, “Like it? I wanna bathe in it?” The best part about this scene is that it actually happened in real life back in my Executive Chef days. Pat was a server at my restaurant and one of his tables asked him if he liked the lobster bisque I had prepared that night, and that was his reply to the customer. So, there’s always that fun element for me when I’m writing.

Then there’s Tim Baker (yes, the same Tim Baker who’s part of this panel). I met Tim when I was 13 and he became a great friend and mentor to me after my dad died two years later. His friendship was much needed and appreciated, and that friendship is now going on over 30 years. He’s another person who’s character is close to how he is in real life, and I portray his book character in the same way as I just did here. I always try to interject him in the book one way or another, whether it’s just a friendly phone call to ask for advice, or as in my most recent novel, Blood Dawn, he actually has a role in the book. I didn’t make it too big of a role though, as I fear this would cause his head and ego to inflate to levels we wouldn’t be able to control…

Chris Barili: Sure they do, but of course I can’t think of one right now. Usually, it’s the bad guys who do it. But in Guilty (Prequel to the Hell’s Butcher Series), Frank Butcher surprised me with  how he ended the book and settled whether he’d go to heaven or hell. Totally was not planned. (No spoilers…read the book.)

Tim Baker: I would have to say that almost everything they do is a surprise, since I am basically learning about them the whole time I’m writing. I won’t give a specific example, but in my first novel, Living the Dream, one of the main characters is a perpetual loser named Kurt. His exploits surprised me so much that sometimes, as I was writing, I would literally laugh out loud at some of the situations he got himself into!

Art Rosch: My characters surprise me all the time.  Especially as I like to give them numinous powers and skills that are pure fantasy and wish-fulfillment.  I wish I could be more like Aaron Kantro.  Or more like Garuvel Zimrin, a man who has ultimate power but declines to use it any more than is absolutely necessary.  My characters talk to me and they appear in dreams.  They say things like “Go left”.  Or, “That spoon is funky”.  You know what the shrinks say: you are the main character in all of your dreams.  And this one from Jung: “Your pathology isn’t about what your parents did to you.  It’s about your fantasy of what your parents did to you.”

I was very surprised when Aaron Kantro went to Afghanistan and fell in with the Mujahiddin.  He was trying to buy and smuggle opium into the U.S.  He had sunk that low; become a criminal drug dealer and addict.  I was surprised by the way he was able to use his experience to change and heal his addiction.  I had to go through fifteen years of therapy.  Aaron found his healing in the cauldron of a Russian attack.  The friendships and bonds with Afghan warriors brought out the warrior in himself. Surprise is pretty much continual in writing.  I ‘m surprised I can write anything, much less finish so bold a project as a fantasy trilogy.  I’m surprised that I’m even conscious.

In more recent work I’ve created a world and a political situation that is based on the breakup of the former Yugoslavia.  This is my trilogy, The Shadow Storm.  I’m pleased with the first book.  The characters are from a completely different milieu than the one in which we live.  I have nothing in common with them except my membership in the human race.  This is a project that involved huge amounts of research.  I read everything I could get my hands on with regard to Balkan history.  In school I studied Russian for four years.  That helped me build a world with a strongly Slavic flavor.  World building is a great pleasure for me.  Creating new and bizarre religions, mapping out geographical features, the entire endeavor is one that challenges both my imagination and my erudition.  I have the additional satisfaction of avoiding the High Fantasy genre, the medieval world of dragons, knights, the whole kaboodle of Game Of Thrones lore.  I love the stuff, but it takes masterful writers like Jack Vance to hold my interest.  If you’ve never read Jack Vance, start now!  He passed recently, at the age of 96.  He left behind a body of sci fi and fantasy that must add up to nearly a hundred books.  I read them and re-read them every few years.  Vance is a better writer, technically, than Philip K. Dick.  The late and sadly lamented Phil Dick is more widely known, has sold more movie scripts than Jack Vance.  Between the two of them, I’ve learned almost everything I  know, which amounts to about a bowl of split pea soup.

 

Do your characters talk to you? What kinds of things do your characters say?
DeAnna Knippling: Yes, although it depends on the character.  Often a very strong character will make observations about the real world.  I have one guy I’m writing who doesn’t like to eat all that much, and mainly eats sandwiches.  He looks upon some of the things I eat with suspicion.  I mean, the guy doesn’t even particularly care for cheese.  “It’s fuel.”
Jordan Elizabeth:  They don’t literally talk, but as I’m writing, I can see them acting out the parts.
Chris DiBella: I don’t know that they talk to me. I just try to write dialogue and plot as it comes naturally to me. I do, however, feel like I have a strong emotional bond and connection to my characters. Every time I start writing a new book, it’s like seeing some old friends after an extended timeframe and I can’t wait to see what they’re up to next.
Chris Barili: No. I don’t exist in their world. They talk to each other sometimes and I overhear…
Tim Baker: I would have to say no to this one.
And now for the fun question.
If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead? Why would they be a good choice?  
Jordan Elizabeth: Megan Fox would be perfect to play Krieg in Kistishi Island.  She has Krieg’s attitude and looks.
Janet Garber: Dream Job, Wacky Adventures of an HR Manager’s protagonist, Melie Kohl, should be played by actress Mary Elizabeth Winstead because she can be goofy, smart and appealing.
Chris DiBella: I’ve been thinking a lot about this one lately, because I’m hoping my books will one day be on the big screen. When I began writing my first novel in 2001, I had a vision in my head of which actor looked most like my main character. That actor was Matthew McConaughey. Of course, Clive Cussler’s novel, Sahara, came out in 2005 and dashed my hopes of that ever happening…fyi: Cussler is my favorite author, so I wouldn’t want to steal his Dirk Pitt….but ya never know. If there was anyone more recent, I might have to say Jeffrey Donovan (Burn Notice). He’s got the charming personality and bad ass moves to get the job done….but only if he brings Fiona with him!
Margareth Stewart: Open/ Pierre´s journey after war has Pierre as the central character – I can easily portrait either Jeremy Irons or Clint Eastwood playing the main role in a film. They both have similarities with Pierre – tall, charming, with profound eyes – gentlemen. They have an inch of outsiders, a little bit like Pierre, too. It would be lovely to see them acting as Pierre.
Tim Baker: The lead character in most of my books is an ex-Navy SEAL named Ike. The prototype for him was originally the character of Wade Garret in the movie Road House (played by Sam Elliot). Since Sam is getting a bit old, I think the next actor best for the role is Anson Mount (from Hell on Wheels).
Cynthia Vespia: My latest Silke Butters Superhero Series was written with an Indian protagonist to showcase more diversity. While I was writing her I used actress Priyanka Chopra as inspiration so it would be a dream come true to have her play my lead Silke aka Karma.
It seems that we may all be different in our process, but our characters all come from the same place: within us. Everyone who answered it, said they use real people that they know to develop their characters and it seems our characters can’t help but have a little bit of us in them. Our stories and our characters are drawn from our own experiences, even if they are fictional, and our characters seem more real to readers when our writing comes from the heart. Be sure to drop by next Monday, when we will Ask the Authors about action and dialog.

If you have a question you’ve always wanted answered, but it’s not covered in the post on that topic, or if our panel’s answers have stirred new questions within you, pose your query in the comments. Make note if it is directed toward a specific author. Questions will be directed to the general panel unless otherwise specified. Then, in the final post for the series, I will present your questions and the responses I recieved from panel members.

 

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“Ask the Authors” is Coming to “Writing to be Read”

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I’m excited to tell you about a new series of posts coming to Writing to be Read. Starting next Monday, “Ask the Authors” will pose the questions you want to ask to our panel of authors, and I’ll bring you their answers. The series will cover all aspects of writing, with topics including the writing process and elements of craft, and issues surrounding publishing, and building a platform, marketing and promotion, with members from our panel weighing in on each subject. If you have follow-up questions for the panel or for the individual authors, you can leave them in the comments. I will get them answered and post them in the concluding post, so be sure to catch the whole series.

Our panel consists of eleven members, which I’d like to introduce to you today. All of them, I have worked with here on Writing to be Read, either reviewing their books or interviewing them, or both. Many have participated in either my 2016 Publishing series: “Pros and Cons of Traditionional vs. Independent  vs. Self-Publishing” or my 2017 Book Marketing series: “Book Marketing: What Works?”. They are all outstanding authors and together, they cover a wide variety of genres and publishing routes. Feel free to pose any questions for them of for the panel in general in the comments of any of the posts and I will try to get them answered for you. I hope all my readers will give each of them a warm welcome.

Tim flagler filmTim Baker is a Florida author of ten novels, most of which I’ve read more than once. His work is well crafted and entertaining, with memorable characters you can’t help but care about. (See my reviews of Tim’s books: Living the Dream, No Good Deed, Water Works, Backseat to JusticeUnfinished Business, Pump It Up, Eyewitness BluesFull Circle, 24 Minutes) He started out his writing career with a publisher, but has now moved into the independent publishing arena.

Tim has played almost every sport imaginable throughout his life and currently enjoys S.C.U.B.A. diving, riding his motorcycle, reading and watching movies, (not necessarily in that order). In fact when writing a novel, he approaches it like he’s creating and watching a movie in his head. When asked who he’d like to play the lead character if one of his books were turned into a movie:

“That’s an easy one…in almost all of my books the hero is a guy named Ike. He is a 6’6” ex-Navy SEAL with a tendency to bend (and sometimes break) the rules. He was modelled after the character of Wade Garret, played by Sam Elliot, in Road House – but Sam is getting a bit old to play Ike so the next best thing is an actor named Anson Mount (from the series Hell on Wheels).”

Something his readers might not gues about him: “After reading my books I think most people would be surprised to learn that I am very non-violent. I don’t believe that violence ever solves anything. I also don’t own a gun (but I don’t care if you do), nor do I know much about them. Most of the technical jargon I use about guns in my books I learn from people who know. And I would go out of my way to avoid hostility.”

When asked to describe himself in three words: “Impossible to describe (that’s 3 words!!)”.

Living the Dream was one of the first reviews I did on Writing to be Read back in 2010. I’ve interviewed him for both my 2016 Publishing series and my 2017 Book Marketing series, as well as an author profile back in 2012, and I am pleased to welcome Tim to our Ask the Authors” panel.

You can learn more about Tim and his books at his website: www.blindoggbooks.com.

Author Jordan Elizabeth Hollack

Jordan Elizabeth is a New York small press author of Young Adult fiction. (See my reviews of Jordan’s books: Escape From Witchwood Hollow, Cogling, Victorian, The Goat Children, Path to Old Talbot, Kistishi Island, Treasure Darkly, Wicked Treasure, Runners & Riders)

One of her secrets for juggling her writing career and family is to set aside one hour a night just for writing. If she’s fortunate enough to set aside two hours, she uses the second hour for marketing. When asked: “What is one thing readers would never guess about you?” She replied: “I am terrified of costumed characters.  Think head-to-toe Mickey Mouse.  If I see one, I freak out.” 

I have reviewed Jordan’s work, both novels and short fiction since 2016, and I had the pleasure of interviewing her for both my 2016 Publishing series and for my 2017 Book Marketing series, and we started off the new year with another interview to talk about her latest book, Secrets of Bennett Hall. In fact, when asked to relate about the most fun interview she’d ever done, she replied, “Anything by you.  You always ask unusual questions that really get me thinking.” So thank you for that, Jordan. It pleases me to no end to have you join our “Ask the Authors” panel.

You can learn more about Jordan and her books at JordanElizabethBooks.com.

Margareth StewartMargareth Stewart is the pen name for Mônica Mastrantonio, debut author of Open/ Pierre’s Journey After War published by web-e-books.com. She has also compiled and published three international Anthologies featuring global authors: Whitmanthology, Womenthology, The Pain that Unites us All.

She holds a PhD in Social Psychology, and she has been teaching and tutoring students over 22 years. This zen-mother of 3, loves life and her tattoos. She spends her time between Sao Paolo, Miami and writing residencies.

When asked about her favorite form of exercise: “Jogging – that´s kind of an obligation for me. As writers, we tend to sit for long hours, so every single day, I do try to keep that up and go out for a short run of 4 to 5 kilometers. If I have more time, I go round a park nearby and that makes 6 kilometers. I do recommend it – it keeps our mind sharp and our ideas bright.

I only recently met Margareth through my interview with her, but I am happy to have Margareth as a panel member.

You can learn more about Margareth and her book on her Facebook page.

Chris DiBellaChris DiBella is currently an independent California author. (See my reviews of Chris’ books: The 5820 Diaries, Whispering Death, Blood Dawn) I say this because Chris has been all over. Originally from New England, he began writing his first novel while living in Hawaii. I reviewed his debut novel, Lost Voyage, back when he was a Colorado author and I was the Southern Colorado Literature Examiner, as well.

I met Chris through another author on this panel, Tim Baker, and it is apparently Tim who gave Chris the best piece of advice he’s ever received:

“I wrote a blog piece about how it’s okay to sometimes alienate your readers…to a point. One of the comments on it was from my friend Tim, who said this:

“If Stephen King or JK Rowling want to piss people off, they can afford it. You and me? We should be a little more careful. Just sayin’.”

And that was the roundabout way of giving me the best piece of advice I could’ve ever received. I immediately got on my laptop, opened up a blank Word document, and typed in big bold letters “BE BIGGER THAN STEPHEN KING & J.K. ROWLING”.

Chris’ words to you readers: “I am however, an open book…..every pun intended….so if there’s anything you would like to know about me or about what makes me tick, please feel free to reach out and ask away. I love interacting with fans and I welcome any questions you may have.”

Soon you can learn more about Chris and his books at his website, which is under construction ans linked to his blog site: www.chrisdibella.com. For now, it might be easier to contact him through his Facebook page.

Janet GarberJanet Garber is the author of both fiction and non-fiction who lives in the U.K. and bases her writing on her experiences as an H.R. manager in New York.

Janet says that if Dream Job, Wacky Adventures of an HR Manager were made into a film, anyone playing her protagonist, Melie Kohl, would have to be believable as a New Yorker, funny and self deprecating, wildly imaginative, more than a little neurotic.  She suggest Mary Elizabeth Winstead, star of that great political satire, BrainDead.

When asked what she would do in a life without writing, she says: “I would do what I always do when I’m avoiding my work: knitting, hiking, going to movies, cooking, getting together with friends, travelling, teaching. But . . .I prefer a future  with maximum creativity and that means writing.”

I reviewed Janet’s debut novel,  Dream Job, Wacky Adventures of an HR Manager,  and thought it was one of the quirkiest books I’ve ever read, but it was very entertaining. I hope you will all give her a warm welcome.

If you’d like to learn more about Janet or her books, visit her at:

Her website: http://www.janetgarber.com

On Lulu: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Melie5

Amazon Author Page: amazon.com/author/melie5

Art RoschArt Rosch is an independent novelist and memoirist from sunny California. (See my reviews of The Road Has Eyes and Confessions of an Honest Man. Also see my interview with Art for my 2016 Publishing series here.)

Art says the best piece of advice he was ever given was to ask for help when you need it.  If you find yourself bottoming out, don’t hesitate to ask for help.  You can’t get out of trouble by yourself. When asked to describe himself in three words: Becoming more alive.

I’ve known Art since 2008, when I administered my own writing site, Writer’s World, and Art was a member. Later, he had his life partner, Fox, who is a pet pyschic, do a reading for me after my son died and we inherited his dog. I am so pleased to welcome him to the “Ask the Authors” panel.

You can learn more about Art and his books at Arthur Rosch Books or on his blog Write Out Of My Head.

Carol Riggs author_smallerCarol Riggs is a Young Adult fantasy and science fiction author, and dragon collector from Oregon.  You will usually find her in her writing cave, surrounded by her dragon collection and the characters in her head.

The most fun part of writing for Carol is “the freedom of drafting a first draft, and being imaginative with my storyline.” The least fun part: “The least fun is marketing, all that necessary left-brained business side of things.”

Carol’s favorite genres to read (and write!) are speculative, which includes fantasy, science fiction, steampunk, magical realism, contemporary fantasy, or anything else with a twist of weird or the imaginative.

When asked what she would do in a future where the was no writing: I would cry. Seriously (after I finished crying), I would return to my artwork, because I have a degree in Studio Arts and that is something I love to do, but haven’t had as much time to do it because I’m so busy writing. In general, I enjoy drawing people more than landscapes. I also like to create miniature fabric art.

I have reviewed Carol’s books on two occasions, and I welcome her as a valuable addition to our “Ask the Authors” panel. (See my reviews of Carol’s books: Bottled and The Lying Planet.)

You can learn more about Carol or her books at her website: http://www.carolriggs.com/

deannakDeAnna Knippling is another independent Colorado author and one of the a great example of what being a writer is all about. She writes full time as a writer for hire in addition to writing fiction in both short and long forms under her own name. (See my reviews of DeAnna’s books: Clockwork Alice; Something Borrowed, Something Blue; How Smoke Got Out of the Chimneys; ) Her stories are always fun and entertaining.

The most unusual or unique thing she’s done in her writing career to date: “I’ve written murder mystery party games for Freeform Games in the UK.  SO VERY COOL.  So very intense getting them edited…”

When asked about what she would do in a future without writing, she replied: “Be in a coma.” and in one where writing made her rich and famous: “I would buy a house in the mountains and support my husband in the sloth and luxury that he deserves.  I have other plans, too, but that’s at the top of the list.”

When asked to describe herself in three words: “I’m right heeeeeeere!”

I had the pleasure of interviewing her twice in 2017. The first time, a profiling interview and then for my 2017 Book Marketing series, and I am thrilled to welcome her to our “Ask the Authors” panel.

You can learn more about Deanna and her books by visiting the following sites:

Goodreads
www.WonderlandPress.com
www.facebook.com/deanna.knippling

colorheadshot - CopyCynthia Vespia an award nominated speculative fiction author, cover designer and promotional content developer. She also teaches internet advertising classes and marshal arts workshops. Her speculative fiction encompasses fantasy, the paranormal, and magic realism.

When asked if one of her books was made into a film, who she would you like to play the lead: One of my books is currently in the beginning stages of becoming a film. It is based on my novel The Crescent and it is a female gladiator tale called Gladiatrix. If I could have anyone in the lead role I would choose Gal Gadot. She is not only hot in features, but she is a hot name right now coming off of Wonder Woman and Justice League. The way she presents herself in the beginning of Wonder Woman on the island of Themyscera is perfect for my gladiator tale, and she can fight too!

Cynthia was another of Writing to be Read‘s first reveiws and, always willing to jump in where needed, she participated in a profiling interview, my 2017 Book Marketing series. (See my reviews of Cynthia’s books: the Demon Hunter Saga, including The Hero’s CallLife, Death and Back; Lucky Sevens)

You can learn more about Cynthia and her books at her website: www.cynthiavespia.com/ 

Chris Barili-1521Chris Barili is a speculative fiction and romance author who was also my cohort in the M.F.A. in Creative Writing program at Western. (See my reviews of Chris’ books: the Hell’s Butcher series and his romance, Smothered (as B.T. Clearwater).)

Besides writing, Chris lifts weights, mountain bikes, practices martial arts and battles Parkinson’s disease. Writing just may be his salvation. When asked about a future where writing left him rich and famous, Chris said he would write more. Regarding a future without writing: “Shrivel up and die. Writing is part of me. Without it, a part of me dies. A crucial part of me. I cannot  live without it. I can live without an arm or a leg. I can get by with this Parkinson’s thing. But without writing, I am sunk.”

The best piece of advice he was ever given: “Try genres outside of fantasy.” In addition to my reviews of Chris’s books and short fiction, he was also interviewed for my 2017 Book Marketing series, and I’m happy to have him as a member of our “Ask the Authors” panel.

You can learn more about Chris and his books at his Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/Chris-Barili/e/B00NA04S8W/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_4

As you can see, we’ve got a terrific panel of multi-talented authors, both experienced and rising, representing a diversity of genres, covering a wide range of knowledge. The way this series works is I will present a series of posts that will offer answers the panel gives  in reponse to my questions.

If you have a question you’ve always wanted answered, but it’s not covered in the post on that topic, pose your query in the comments. Make note if it is directed toward a specific author. Questions will be directed to the general panel unless otherwise specified. Then, in the final post for the series, I will present your questions and the responses I recieved from panel members. I hope you’ll all participate and leave your questions in the comments. I think if we can get enough particiaption it might be really fun.

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Book Marketing – What Works? (Part 4): Interview with author Tim Baker

Blindogg Books

So far, in this Book Marketing – What Works? series, we’ve heard from speculative fiction author Cynthia Vespia in Part 1, who does all of her own marketing; taken a look at Mark Todd and Kym O’Connell Todd’s online marketing strategies in Part 2; and glimpsed the value of paid advertising with YA author Jordan Elizabeth in Part 3, whose street team was pivotal in getting reviews for her books. This week, we’ll take a look at branding with an author who has developed a brand of his own for his books, Tim Baker.

Tim and I have been acquainted for several years now. He’s a talented writer, whose books are fun and entertaining. I’ve reviewed most of his books at one time or another: Water Hazard, No Good Deed, Backseat to Justice, Full Circle, Pump It Up, Living the Dream, Eyewitness Blues, and Unfinished BusinessTim also weighed in on my Pros and Cons of Traditional vs. Independent vs. Self-Publishing series, where he heralded the advantages of self-publishing. Today he’ll talk a little about branding and about the effectiveness of free promotions.

Kaye: How long have you been writing and publishing your own books?

Tim: My first seven books were published by small press publishers. I decided to publish under my own brand (Blindogg Books) with the release of Full Circle in 2015. Since then I have released one other novel (Blood in the Water) and a collection of short stories (Path of a Bullet).

Kaye: You talk about creating your own brand. Of course, I knew about BlindoggBooks, but we hear about brands all the time. Can you elaborate and explain what it takes to create a brand, and what the advantages are with having your own brand?

Tim: I doubt that the way I created my brand is textbook, but here it is…

At some point between my first and second novel I thought it would be a good idea to have a website. My first attempt was rudimentary at best, but it served the purpose.

While creating it I decided I didn’t want to use my name as the headline. Several years earlier I had doodled an image of a dog wearing dark glasses (a blind dog – more on that story can be found here – https://blindoggbooks.wordpress.com/2012/08/14/is-your-dog-really-blind/ ). So from that point forward Blindogg Books became my brand name…the next step was getting it out there.

I put the doodle on everything…my website, my facebook page all of my social media accounts, book marks, and all sorts of paraphernalia which I would give away at signings and anywhere else I could.

Before long my blind dog was very popular and people recognized it – which I think is the desired result – right?!

As far as advantages, I guess I subconsciously followed the lead of many big name companies who have a recognizable logo. People may not always remember my name, but they always remember the blind dog!

As I’ve said before, my marketing tactics are strictly “learn as I go” – and so far it’s working for me, so I’ll just keep plugging along. I tweek things here and there, but I don’t see myself getting rid of my brand name.

Kaye: What made you decide to go with self-publishing?

Tim: There were two main reasons: Cost and Control.

Using a small press publisher is not free…and it’s usually not cheap. The cost of buying a batch of ISBNs and paying somebody to format the book for kindle and paperback saves me hundreds of dollars with each release.

Self publishing (I actually prefer the term independent publishing) also allows me to have much more control over when my book is released, etc.

Kaye: How many books have you published to date?

Tim: Nobody told me there would be math in this interview!!

So far I have published nine novels, one collection of short stories and two novellas. My tenth novel (24 Minutes) is scheduled to be released in the fall of 2017.

Kaye: What is the biggest challenge of being a writer today?

Tim: This is a tricky question, because it will vary from writer to writer…JK Rowlings’ biggest challenge is probably how to spend her money, while mine is trying to find enough time to write, publish and market my books while working a full time job and trying to have a social life.

Kaye: You’ve come up with some great titles. How do you decide the titles for your books? Where does the title come in the process for you?

Tim: I try to pick a title that does a few things at once…I want it to intrigue the potential reader (very important), I want it to fit the story without giving too much away, and I want it to be catchy. It isn’t always easy, and I usually go through more than one idea. The final title will usually come to me when I’m nearly done with the first draft – although there have been a couple of books where I had the title before I started writing (Full Circle and Backseat to Justice).

Kaye: Do you do any kind of free promotions, where you offer your books for free? If so, how does that work for you?

Tim: Yes. I often offer titles for free download (usually around the release of a new title in order to stimulate a little buzz for the new one) and they always work extremely well. I do giveaways on Goodreads, which also helps to get my name out there. I also give away paperbacks quite frequently. For the amount of money a paperback costs me (usually around $4) I find it’s highly effective to give one to a new reader…it almost always leads them to purchase other titles. We all know the value of word-of-mouth advertising, and giving somebody a free book (which, hopefully, they will enjoy) is a great way to get some. Of course it is much easier for me to give books away now that I have 13 titles under my belt. Back in the day, when I only had two or three, I didn’t feel as though it was as beneficial since I had to give away one book in order to get people to (possibly) buy the other two.

Kaye: Do you participate in KDP Select on Amazon? Do you feel this program is conducive to selling books?

Tim: Yes, I do. As to whether it is conducive to selling books, I really don’t know. KDP allows you to do giveaways, so in that respect the answer would be yes. However, once you sign on to KDP you agree not to sell your books on any other venues (other than live book signings and such) which is somewhat counterproductive as far as selling a larger quantity of books. In all honesty, even though I’ve been selling books for nearly ten years, I still don’t know what works best. If I did I’d have a yacht by now!

Kaye: What works best to sell books for you, as far as marketing goes?

Tim: I don’t think there is one method or specific act that works best…I believe the best marketing tactic is to be consistent, relentless and tenacious. Marketing (to me) isn’t a part time job – it’s a non-stop effort. I often tell people that for every hour I spend writing, I usually put in three or four marketing. This could involve anything from social media posts to handing out bookmarks. I’ve tried a thousand different things and it isn’t one or two of them that made a difference, it was the continual act of doing it.

Kaye: How much work do you contract out? Book Covers? Editing? Marketing? Etc…?

Tim: I contract editing, formatting and cover art. Marketing I do myself, because I have yet to find a so-called marketing expert who will either charge me based on the level of success of their campaign (e.g. work on commission) or give me some sort of a guarantee before I pay them. If you send me an email stating you are the latest and greatest book marketer – I think you ought to back it up, rather than back-pedal with inane statements like “Well, there are no guarantees in marketing.”

Kaye: What do you do for cover art? DIY, or hired out, or cookie cutter prefab?

Tim: I always contract it out, and for the most part I use one particular artist (I call her my cover girl!) I will gladly give her contact info to anybody interested.

Kaye: If writing suddenly made you rich and famous, what would you do?

Tim: I would;

  1. Quit my day job
  2. Buy a yacht
  3. Write more books
  4. Donate large sums of money to organizations that support human rights and animal rights
  5. Hire the surviving members of Led Zeppelin to play at my next birthday party.

(in that order!)

Kaye: What is the one thing in your writing career that is the most unusual or unique thing you’ve done so far?

Tim: Interesting question…After careful consideration I’d have to say that the most unusual thing I’ve done as a writer happened when I was writing my sixth novel, Unfinished Business. Research is part of an author’s life, to varying degrees, and my research for Unfinished Business was a bit unusual. The book is about a woman named Meg, a mortician who somehow inherits the task of carrying out the last thoughts of the bodies she embalms. In order to make the book as true to life as possible I interviewed a mortician friend of mine (whose name also happens to be Meg – coincidence? You decide!). So for over three hours I asked questions and learned more than I ever thought I would want to know about the preparation of corpses for funerals, and the life of a mortician.

I’d call that unusual and unique!

I want to thank Tim for joining us today to share his experiences and marketing advice. If  you’d like to know more about Tim Baker or his books, check out his blindoggbooks blog, or visit his website, or his Goodreads author page. You can also find him on his Facebook Fan Page or Twitter: @blindoggbooks. Watch for my review of Tim’s latest book, 24 Minutes, which will be out the end of October or early November.

I hope you’ll join us next week, when we talk with romance author Amy Cecil, who launches her marketing strategies on social media and uses a P.A. and a street team in Part 5 of Book Marketing – What Works?.

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Pros and Cons of Traditional vs. Independent vs. Self-Publishing (Part 2): Interview with Self-Published author, Tim Baker

tim-baker-books

Today I want to talk a little about definitions, because people often independent publishing as an umbrella term to cover authors who are self-published, as well as those authors who are published through an independent publishing house. I’m guilty of this, too, as the title for this article series does not differentiate, although the series will be looking at all three options. From here on out, I will differentiate between self-published and independently published authors, and refer to smaller presses as independent presses vs, the larger publishing houses, which shall be referred to as traditional publishers.

 

In Part 1 of this series, I interviewed self-published author Jeff Bowles to get his thoughts on the publishing industry as an emerging author today. Today’s interview is with Tim Baker, the author of nine novels, two novellas, and a collection of short stories, all self-published under his own brand, Blindogg Books. I’ve had the privilege of reviewing many of those books and can tell you he writes a well crafted story. His publishing credits include Living the Dream, Water Hazard, Backseat to Justice, No Good Deed, Unfinished Business, Eyewitness BluesPump It Up, Full Circle, Dying Days, with Armand Rosamillia, and Path of a Bullet. You can contact Tim Baker or find out more about his work by visiting his website at blindoggbooks.com.

 

Kaye: Would you share your own publishing story with us?

Tim: My love for reading came early in life when I discovered Treasure Island and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn at the age of ten.

A high school journalism class and a creative writing course in college turned my love of reading into a love of writing. In 1988, I began writing a book called Full Circle, which combined my love of writing with my interest in Karma. A chain of events caused the unfinished, handwritten manuscript to be tucked into a box. During the ‘90s, my time was divided between raising my son, owning a home and building a career in engineering, leaving no time for writing. It remained untouched until February of 2015 when I dusted it off and completed it for release in November 2015.

By the time I moved to Florida in 2006, my dream of penning a novel was all but forgotten…until one night when a dream rekindled my passion for writing.

Then, in April 2007, I had a dream about two old friends and a submerged box of gold bars. The next day I found himself trying to figure out the story behind the dream. By the end of that day, the impetus of a story had formed and I had scribbled out two chapters in a spiral notebook.

One year later, my first novel, Living the Dream, was complete and the dam had burst — I soon followed up with my second novel Water Hazard.

Kaye: When did you know you wanted to be an author?

Tim: The funny thing is that I never really wanted to be an author – at least not consciously.

Even though I’ve always enjoyed reading and writing…it wasn’t until after my first book was published that I realized I was an author. All of a sudden I was an author – which was fine, because by then I had come to the realization that I loved writing.

Kaye: What made you decide to self-publish?

Tim: It wasn’t until after I completed the manuscript for my first novel (Living the Dream) that I started thinking about having it published. After a year of research I had learned a great deal about the differences between traditional publishing and indie publishing, and I decided that indie suited me better – primarily because I had read dozens of accounts about the overwhelming odds of landing a traditional publishing contract. I was not thrilled with the prospect of putting the fate of my novel in the hands of somebody who could shoot it down for any reason at all. This just didn’t seem fair.

Kaye: How did Blindogg Books come about?

Tim: Blindogg Books came about because my research taught me that indie authors need a brand for marketing purposes. I also learned that there are at least 3 other published authors named Tim Baker…so I decided to go with something other than my name.

During the 90s I raised and socialized puppies to be guide dogs for the blind…eventually I picked up the nickname “blind dog” which was changed to blindogg for internet identity reasons. When I needed a name for my brand I thought Blindogg Books had a nice ring to it. (for more info on this go to my blog)

Kaye: What do you see as the pros and cons of independent publishing?

Tim: I’ve had this conversation with many people and I like to sum it up this way;

Independent publishing is a “good news/bad news” situation. The good news is that anybody can publish a book – the bad news…anybody can publish a book. The vast majority of indie authors produce quality work, however the fate of their work depends on the book buying public, so when potential readers read one of the few indie works that just wasn’t ready for publication (for whatever reason) they tend to paint all indie authors with the broad brush of low quality. So even though it’s very easy to have your work published, it’s very difficult to convince readers who have had a bad experience that your work is worthy of their money.

Kaye: What do you see as the pros and cons of traditional publishing?

Tim: Not having any experience in the traditional world I can only speculate. I have to think that having the power of a large publishing house behind you for promotion and advertising is a nice relief from self-promotion. I also think it would be nice to get a big advance for a book. On the down side, I wouldn’t want to work under a contract which dictates when I have to finish a book. I’ve also heard that those big advances are only good if you sell enough books to cover the amount advanced. Obviously we all think our work will sell – but if it doesn’t (for whatever reason) I’d hate to have to give money back!

Kaye: What do you see as the pros and cons of independent publishing?

Tim: I’ve had this conversation with many people and I like to sum it up this way;

Independent publishing is a “good news/bad news” situation.

The good news is that anybody can publish a book – the bad news…anybody can publish a book.

The vast majority of indie authors produce quality work, however the fate of their work depends on the book buying public, so when potential readers read one of the few indie works that just wasn’t ready for publication (for whatever reason) they tend to paint all indie authors with the broad brush of low quality. So even though it’s very easy to have your work published, it’s very difficult to convince readers who have had a bad experience that your work is worthy of their money.

Kaye: How much work do you contract out? Book Covers? Editing? Etc…?

Tim: Everything!! I write it – then let others do the things I’m not qualified to do. This includes editing, formatting (for kindle and paperback) and cover design/layout. Many indie authors try to do these things themselves, but I would rather pay somebody to do it because I know they’ll do a much better job than I will and I won’t be wasting my time doing something that somebody else could do in half the time, leaving me more time for writing and marketing.

The most important one of the lot (in my opinion) is editing. Any money spent on a qualified editor is money well spent. Hiring your high school English teacher or a friend/relative who is “really good at English and reads a lot” will not give you a professional quality job.

Nobody knows more than me how difficult it is to fork out hundreds of dollars foran editor, but I want my books to be the best they can be.

Kaye: So, you’re saying self-published books that aren’t of good quality stigmatize the reputation of independently published books in general?

Tim: Yes. Readers, like all consumers, don’t want to waste money on sub-par products, so if they buy an indie book that is poorly written, edited or formatted they are likely to assume that this is the level of quality for all indie books.

Kaye: Do you think one of the major contributing factors to this stigma is authors who don’t want to spend money to have their books professionally edited? Or do you see other causes?

Tim: Absolutely. This is one of my biggest pet peeves. As I said above, many indie authors think editors are like dentists – a necessary evil. I think a qualified editor is more like a good tailor. You can buy a suit off the rack and it might look decent, but a suit that is professionally tailored will make you look outstanding – and people will notice the difference!

This is not to say there aren’t other causes.

People who write a book without trying to learn even the most basic “rules” lower the bar for all of us. I hate using the word rules, let’s say guidelines…whatever you want to call them – they are critical to producing a book that will make people want to read your next one. These days there is no excuse for not learning how to write a good book. There are a gazillion websites and blogs out there devoted to teaching people how to write – use them. Most of them are free.

But – the best way to learn how to write is to read. Learn from the good books as well as the bad…

Kaye: How much non-writing work, (marketing & promotion, illustrations & book covers, etc…), do you do yourself for your books?

Tim: I don’t have an exact number, but my conservative estimate is that for every hour I spend writing – I spend three hours marketing. I tell people all the time – writing the book is the easy part…selling it is where the work starts.

Kaye: Would you recommend your chosen path to publication, to emerging writers? Why or why not?

Tim: I’m not sure how to answer that – mostly because my path wasn’t chosen as much as it was found. I had no idea what I was doing – so I did lots of research – the most valuable of which was learning from other writers. So for any emerging writers who may be reading this I can only say this…there is a ton of information at your fingertips. The internet and especially social media can help you find the path best suited for you. Get out there and tap into it. Ask questions, do your research and learn from those who went before you.

I want to thank Tim for sharing his thoughts on the publishing industry and his advice with us.  Be sure to check out next weeks interview with self-published author, Arthur Rosch, on Writing to be Read.

 

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Full Circle Comes Half-Way

"Full Circle" by Tim BakerTim Baker’s latest novel, Full Circle, is a story about how our choices affect others, sometimes others we don’t even know, in unexpected ways. What does one do when your boss thinks you owe him a favor and asks you to commit murder? Mark Sullivan is faced with the choice and what he does sets in motion surprising events, while his boss, Joe Moretti’s choices set other events in motion, involving other people, and all these paths cross in some very entertaining ways.

As in all of Baker’s books several seemingly unrelated characters weave their way through the intricate details of plot with delightfully entertaining antics. A recovering alcoholic, a single mother trying to make ends meet, a self-centered contractor, an over-protective father, and a homeless woman, who seem to have little in common, find their karmic paths crossing in unexpected ways, but it all comes together when they come Full Circle.

In Living the Dream, a plumber’s apprentice with a moral code ends up crossing paths with a crooked contractor who’s unfaithful to his wife, and the endearing residents of Flagler Beach. In No Good Deed, a homeless guy and a gangster’s girlfriend cross paths with the plumber’s apprentice, who has straightened out his life and is now a groundskeeper trying to live the straight and narrow, some big time mobsters and a two-bit con-man, along with our old friends from Flagler Beach and surrounding areas. It’s one of the things I admire about Baker’s works.
I think the difference with Full Circle may be that the karmic element is the theme of the story, and it feels like the characters are forced to fit the mold on this one. I must admit, I was a little disappointed by it. Tim Baker is a talented author, with the ability to bust out this kind of story with skill and finesse, but it feels off in this book. It’s nothing I can put my finger on, but it didn’t grab my attention from the starting line, like Baker’s other books have. As a result, I found it harder to invest myself in the story and care about the characters.
Don’t get me wrong. Full Circle is a good story, a delightful tale, actually. It will make you smile, and make you sit on the edge of your seat at times. It will draw chuckles in all the right places. Although the execution is a little off, it’s not enough to make me put the book down. I still wanted to keep reading to see what happens next. I give Full Circle three quills.

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You can find Full Circle and other books by Tim Baker on his website, Blindogg Books.


“Unfinished Business” by Tim Baker an entertaining read

"Unfinished Business" by Tim Baker

“Unfinished Business” by Tim Baker

No one is ever ready to die because we never know when our time is up. Some, who die of a terminal illness, may know that death is approaching and have time to put their affairs in order, but death strikes most unprepared and they leave this life with unfinished business hanging… well, unfinished. Unfinished Business by Tim Baker is a creative and original story that explores the possibilities how the universe may balance the scales and take care of those things that have been left unfinished by departed souls. This delightfully entertaining story will tickle your funny bone and keep you guessing.
When Meg Seabury loses her friend and mentor, Lita, she inherits an unexpected gift, although at times she wonders if it isn’t a curse. Suddenly, Meg is able to see the final thoughts of those who cross the threshold of the funeral home where she works, and she soon learns that it is up to her to finish what they didn’t have the chance to take care of. Her new abilities lead her on a strange roller-coaster ride to places she would never go and compels her to do things she would never do in her old “normal” life. Not all that’s left undone are positive events. Meg finds she doesn’t have a choice but to carry through, restoring the balance of the universe, even if it leads her into dangerous situations or could land her in jail.
Unfinished Business is now added to the list of novels by Tim Baker recommended by this reviewer, which also includes Water Hazard, No Good Deed, Pump It Up, Backseat to Justice and Living the Dream. All Tim’s books are available at www.blindoggbooks.com.


Author Tim Baker recommends publishing independently

" Many of the places I enjoy visiting are (coincidentally) the same places Ike and the rest of my characters frequent!"

Independent author Tim Baker has published four novels, under his own personal brand, Blindogg Books, and has at least three more in the making. He published his first book, Living the Dream, in 2009: a story about a kid-napping plot that takes some crazy twists and turns along the way. Since then, he has published Water Hazard, where a stolen set of CDs leads the unwitting hero into more mayhem than he ever imagined; No Good Deed, in which an embezzlement scheme drags unsuspecting characters into the mix to combine forces and outwit the bad guys; and Backseat to Justice, where an effort to find a murderer leads to a web of intrigue that is full of surprises. In fact, all of his books hold surprises in store, making readers feel as if they are on a literary roller coaster at times.
For Tim Baker, writing is a way of life, or as he puts it, “That first novel was a long and arduous process but the dam had burst and I couldn’t hold back the flood. Now I’ve gotten to the point where I am always writing in my head.” His delightful stories begin with “what ifs”, not unlike bestselling author Stephen King (Danse Macbre). Baker’s imagination, however, may not be as bizarre as King’s. Tim likes his readers to feel as if the situations in his stories could possibly happen to them, which he feels is crucial in having them relate to his stories.

“The one key factor I strive to maintain is something I call “the real-life” factor. In a nutshell it works like this…sometimes our lives can be seriously altered by a seemingly insignificant event. A guy forgets to set his alarm clock…the next morning he wakes up late and he’s driving to work but his normal coffee shop has a line a mile long at the drive-thru. He’s running late so he goes to a different one. While he’s there he gets caught up in a hold-up and gets himself shot. All because he forgot to set his alarm clock.”

Tim would recommend becoming an independent author, (what some refer to as self-publishing), for writers trying to get published, as long as they realize that becoming an independent author is a lot of work, with no high paying advances, and no high powered marketing firm to tell the world about your book.

“It’s all on you – and believe me, it’s a full time job. If there’s somebody reading this who thinks they have a book inside them, I say write it…but understand that writing it is only the beginning. Once it is written, edited, re-written, re-edited and re-written again, then formatted and printed – the real work starts. Promoting it.”

When he is not actually writing, he is promoting his work, as all independent authors must. Baker says that he spends countless hours on spreading the word and generating sales. He has reached out successfully to readers through newspaper articles, blog-talk radio and personal appearances, but about 85% of his advertising is done through social media.

“Unless you have a large marketing firm behind you (which is rare) social networking is your bread and butter. You can potentially reach millions of people for practically free. I would say that for every hour I spend writing I spend two hours promoting myself one way or another.”

In addition to the time he spends on writing and promoting his work, Tim holds down a day job in civil engineering and donates time to a local charity, Christmas Come True (www.christmascometrue.org ), that provides Christmas to needy families that are unable to provide Christmas for themselves. He cherishes leisure time, when he can ride his motorcycle along the Florida coast and frequent all the places where his characters hang out. Tim is also interested in martial arts and is a wiffle ball champion, as well as being a huge animal lover.
Tim’s love for animals is apparent in his Facebook “Likes”, which include books about dogs, animal rescue resource pages, animal oriented non-profit organizations, dogs trained to surf with individuals with disabilities, Misty the Dog and Friends, Guiding Eyes for the Blind. In fact, in the 90’s Tim Baker raised Labrador retriever pups to be used as guide dogs for the blind, which may have a lot to do with him calling his brand Blindogg Books, and half the proceeds from his e-book, Back Seat to Justice, will be donated to a non-profit animal rescue organization, Golden Hugs Rescue Inc., (http://www.goldenhuggs.org/index.htm ). Though he considers himself to be “primarily a dog person”, he currently has two cats, Philbert and Blaise.
One might wonder how Tim finds time for all of these things, but somehow he does. His next book, Pump It Up, is due to be out this coming summer and promises to be as fast paced and exciting as all of his previous books, and delves into the realm of black market silicone treatments. He is also planning two others: Unfinished Business, which will explore the connection between this existence and the one beyond death; and Full Circle, which deals with “karma, fate and the forces of the universe.”

As a final thought, Tim would like to add,

“Thank you offering me the opportunity to discuss my work. For anybody who might have more questions, I am more than happy to answer them. I enjoy meeting new readers and exchanging thoughts and ideas – so feel free to connect with me on Facebook, start a discussion, email me – whatever. You’ll get a response from me (not an intern or a flunky) I promise.”


Jeff’s Movie Reviews – The Invisible Man (2020)

Jeff's Movie Reviews

The Monster You Know

by Jeff Bowles

It goes without saying that the new Universal Studios reboot of the horror classic, The Invisible Man, offers a uniquely compelling movie experience for our hyper-political, hyper-aware post-#metoo era. The year 2020 is a very different time from 1933, the year Universal released its classic Claude Rains iteration. We understand the world in a startlingly different fashion, and complex psychology, trauma, abusive romantic relationships, and violence against women are all very much at play in the stories our culture has begun to tell.

Rest assured, though, The Invisible Man is not an overtly political movie. More like a chilling and subtly “woke” product of its times. Gone are all the old monster movie affectations—silly white mummy bandages covering a mysterious face, wired monocles and burning cigarettes floating in mid-air—replaced by psychological horror, emotional and physical torment, circa 2020 big-budget computer generated special effects, and a pretty nifty concept for a military-grade invisibility suit. Not to spoil too much, which really is a challenge with this movie, but the monster in this Universal monster picture is still very much a science fictional prospect. He’s also slightly reminiscent of a bad guy you might find in any average modern video game, which is how you know you’re in for one hell of a boss fight.

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Elisabeth Moss, who is just as excellent here as she is on Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale, plays Cecelia Kass, the traumatized victim of a seemingly abusive relationship who is desperate to escape her wealthy tech developer husband. Cecelia gets free of his post-modern rich dude Dracula castle in the opening sequence of the film, only to learn a couple scenes later he’s ended his own life and left her his fortune. Which, you know, is really just a springboard for some invisible-man-ish fun and mayhem.

What kind of tech does her husband, Adrian, develop? Optics, of course, the kind that can turn someone… well, you know. I say Cecelia is the victim of a seemingly abusive relationship because while its clear Adrian (Oliver Jackson-Cohen) has done some truly terrible things to her, we’re never really sure what they were. It’s sort of a narrative issue, a lack of basic context, because as the action and suspense ratchet up, certain story beats become less formidable. Again, spoilers are easy to drop, but how did this guy get this way? He’s not just a monster. His exists solely to watch you realize your most intimate fears. The film insists on hints and allegations, relies too heavily on stereotypes, but only as it applies to Adrian and his brother, Tom (Michael Dorman), who may or may not suffer from some intense form of younger sibling Stockholm Syndrome.

Realistically, if this movie were called The Wolf Man or Frankenstein, I doubt I’d question how insidious the villain is, but we’re dealing with issues of domination, psycho-sexual violence, and truly, more emotional clarity is called for. Not to put too fine a point on it, but simply tossing around terms like narcissism and sociopathy doesn’t really help fill in a backstory. Lot’s of people are sociopathic and narcissistic, and not too many invent invisibility suits and murder-stalk their exes.

The good news for audiences, however, is that none of the above matters much, because The Invisible Man is a focused and frightfully suspenseful film, full of unexpected twists and a finale that is less cliché good guy, bad guy showdown than morally ambiguous coup d’état. At times, the movie is downright ingenious in its concoction of more and more elaborate and devilish scenarios. The supporting cast is excellent, and thankfully, exist as more than simple horror movie cannon fodder. The real unease and dread of The Invisible Man comes down to a basic relatable fear: if I tell them what’s really happening to me, they’ll call me crazy and put me away.

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Which isn’t to say the movie readily offers up easy explanations for all it entails. As the credits roll, it becomes clear writer/director Leigh Whannell wants us thinking hard about what we’ve just seen. Sharp-eyed viewers will spot the answer to the penultimate question posed by the film within its first few tense opening moments, but some audiences may leave dissatisfied by the ambiguity of it all.

Ultimately, The Invisible Man is about desperation and bare-knuckled survival in the face of victim-hood and victimization, an unavoidable totem of an age in which the sins of very powerful, very sleezy men have been outed in spectacular public fashion. Truly, the film is an intimate and personal take on the classic Universal Pictures series of old. It both loves and understands the need to update its source material, and though the final product is uniquely contemporary, its essential nature remains the same. Imagine an enemy you can’t see, who’s watching you in all your most intimate and private moments, who’s obsessively calculating new ways to make your life a living hell. It’s still a great concept for a horror story, which H.G. Wells must’ve recognized when he published the original novel in 1897.

The most frightening monster is the one who knows you best. Abuse at the hands of a loved one is a horror unlike any other, and in real life, more and more, the world is waking up to the fact that this phantom, this particular invisible man, has plagued us since the very beginning. Ultimately, the conscious approach filmmaker Leigh Whannell and his excellent cast take toward the subject is timely and clear-eyed. This invisible man is a beast of a human being. He’s been in your home, your bed, and he will do whatever it takes to possess, consume, and destroy you. Now that’s scary. And not a single floating cigarette or mummy bandage in sight.

Jeff’s Movie Reviews gives The Invisible Man an 8 out of 10.


Jeff Bowles is a science fiction and horror writer from the mountains of Colorado. The best of his outrageous and imaginative short stories are collected in Godling and Other Paint Stories, Fear and Loathing in Las Cruces, and Brave New Multiverse. He has published work in magazines and anthologies like PodCastle, Tales from the Canyons of the Damned, the Threepenny Review, Nashville Review, and Dark Moon Digest. Jeff earned his Master of Fine Arts degree in creative writing at Western State Colorado University. He currently lives in the high-altitude Pikes Peak region, where he dreams strange dreams and spends far too much time under the stars. Jeff’s new novel, God’s Body: Book One – The Fall, is available on Amazon now!

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You can keep up on what Jeff’s been watching and catch all of his great movie reviews the third Friday of each month on Writing to be Read. Subscribe to email or follow on WordPress today.