Into the Catskills

Writing for a Y.A. Audience

I’m a huge history lover, so anything old has always sparked my interest.  I imagine that an old building can tell me the secrets of the past.  If I walk through its ancient doors, I’ll be transported back in time.  I’ll be able to experience everything that came before.

It hasn’t yet, but I’m still hoping.

One day I was bored, probably tired from work, and decided to look at abandoned buildings online.  I was scrolling through Pinterest and voila, there was a beautiful, crumbling resort.  The image showed an old pool.  Vines crept up broken windows and ferns fought their way through cracked cement.  It was beautiful and haunting.  I clicked to learn more, and discovered it was a resort from the Catskills.

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In their heyday (1920s through the 1960s), the Catskill Mountains were home to numerous fancy resorts.  People came from all over to experience the thrill of the mountains.  Many New Yorkers left the city to experience the calm of the country.  The popular movie, Dirty Dancing, takes place at a resort in the Catskills.

Overtime, interest waned.  From articles I read online, it seems that the readily people could travel on airplanes to distant wonderlands, the less they wanted to travel upstate.  There are still some resorts left and I hope to vacation there someday.  I must admit, though, the abandoned resorts fascinate me more than the ones still standing.

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While looking at more pictures of those abandoned resorts, a story idea came to me.  The world ends and the remains of civilization are holed up inside a crumbling hotel.  Thus was born my post-apocalyptic novella, BUNKER BOY.  If you decide to read it, let me know what you think!  I’d love to know if it has inspired you, too, to check out the old memories of the Catskills.beautiful blond young woman in black hood looking at camera

Jordan Elizabeth is a young adult fantasy author.  She is most likely gazing at something in awe, something she will soon include in one of her novels. You can connect with Jordan via her website, JordanElizabethBooks.com.


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Writing for a YA Audience: The Truth about Libraries

Writing for a Y.A. Audience

“This looks great!”  The young woman picked up my book from the table at the craft show.  She read the back and took a free bookmark.  “I’m going to look for this in the library.”

I let her know which of the local libraries had the book.  Smiling, she left for the next table.

Across the aisle, a woman sold beeswax lip balm.  She shook her head at me.  “That’s a horrible thing for her to say to you.  She should have just bought it.”

Was it a horrible thing, though?

I hear from at least one person at every book signing I do that they’ll look for my books in the library.  I hear from other authors that it happens to them too.  It might sound like a bad thing.  The author isn’t  getting a sale.

Here’s the truth –borrowing your book from the library isn’t a bad thing.  In fact, it’s a great thing.  That person is reading your book.  That’s what all authors want: someone to read the book.  Someone who borrows a book from the library has a limited time to keep that book in their possession, so they’re actually going to read it in a timely fashion.  If you buy a book, it might sit on your shelf unread for years.  That person who just read your book is hopefully going to leave a review.  Bad or a good, a review always brings attention to the book online.

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The reader is going to talk about your book in person too.  They’re going to tell all of their reader friends.  Those friends will hopefully buy or borrow your book.  The buzz about your book is growing.

The more people who take your book out from the library, the longer the library will keep your book in circulation.  They will also order your other books, because hey, you’re a popular author.

For everyone who says you don’t get a sale when someone borrows your book, keep in mind that the library did order your book originally.  Most libraries will be willing to have you autograph their copy and host a book signing.   Libraries are an author’s bosom buddy.

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Jordan Elizabeth is a young adult fantasy author who is often at her local library participating in workshops or browsing the titles.  You can connect with Jordan via her website, JordanElizabethBooks.com.

 

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Writing for a YA Audience: Author Photo Shoot

Writing for a Y.A. Audience

I’ve done a few photo shoots for my author pictures, and they are always so much fun.  I get to feel like a model.  For FANYA IN THE UNDERWORLD, we decided to do things a little differently.  Aaron Siddall illustrated the book and I wrote it; we both brainstormed the concepts.  Because this was a joint collaboration, we decided to have a joint photo.

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A good friend of ours, Monica Reid Keba, met with us at the Utica Train Station, known as Union Station.  The building is beautiful, with marble pillars and chandeliers.  Stepping inside is a little like going back in time.  Many of the fixtures are original from the construction in 1914.  I have a special fondness for the waiting room benches.  Not only do they incorporate the heating system, but they are gorgeous to look at.  The station was designed by Allen Stem and Alfred Fellheimer.  In case you aren’t familiar with those names, they are the architects who designed New York City’s Grand Central Station.

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Aaron Siddall and I posed on the benches, beneath the chandeliers, and outside.  The autumn day was crisp, with a light drizzle in the air.  I hiked up my skirt and scaled the side of an old trolley car.  We also explored the park next door.  The train station is located in the historic Bagg’s Square neighborhood.  The quaint park, surrounded by a stone fence, is home to the site of a log cabin known as Bagg’s Tavern.  This log cabin saw esteemed guests such as George Washington and Ulysses S. Grant.

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If you are ever in the area and love visiting historic sites, check out the train station and Bagg’s Tavern.  Your eyes won’t be disappointed by the sites.

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Jordan Elizabeth is a young adult fantasy author.  She is most likely gazing at something in awe, something she will soon include in one of her novels. You can connect with Jordan – and point her in the direction of some paranormal activity – via her website, JordanElizabethBooks.com.

 

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Writing for a YA Audience: Books in the Library

Writing for a Y.A. Audience

“This is available at the library, right?’  I get that question a lot.

You should know that I talk about my books.  A lot.  I get excited and that passion spills over whether I’m at a book signing or conversing with a coworker.  Some people don’t want to buy books.  They might not like the book, so they don’t want to invest in the purchase, or they don’t want to have books cluttering their homes.  Whatever the reason, libraries are perfect.

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If I’m asked locally, then I get to say yes, my books are available.  Other places…well…not so much.  That surprises people.

Here’s the thing about indie books.  Libraries don’t normally stock them.  They need a reason to purchase a copy.  This could be because you’re a local author, because you did an event there, or because someone requested it.

The best way to help out an author is to ask your local library to purchase a copy.  This is a sale for the author and exposure.  People are going to borrow the book, read it, and talk about.  There is no marketing tool as powerful as word of mouth.

Jordan Elizabeth is a young adult fantasy author.  She’s often wandering libraries looking for something to spark her interest…or she’s squealing over a treasure discovered in a used book room.  You can connect with her via her website

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Writing for a YA Audience: Romance Darkly

Writing for a Y.A. Audience

My mom and uncle are obsessed with Westerns. They grew up watching Westerns and still make time for them every weekend. While watching a Western with my mom, I had the idea of writing a young adult Western…with a steampunk twist. I brainstormed a ranch with a family secret. Along came TREASURE DARKLY.

After the first draft, it was recommended I add in a romantic theme. Thus, Clark and Amethyst fell in love. It worked. I didn’t have to force them together. They were already best friends, and it flowed that they should develop romantic feelings for each other.

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Then came the challenging part. My first editor for the story wanted more romance.  I wasn’t a romance writer.  Sure, my main characters each had a love interest, but I wouldn’t call my early works romances.

I set out to read romance novels to get a feel for the genre. I read some young adult romances, some Harlequins, and then I discovered a love of paranormal romance. I devoured those and wanted more. Eventually, I felt ready to write my own romance.

Young adult romances are tricky. Some people don’t want any sex in YA novels; some people say its okay. I struggled with that fine line before firmly stepping onto the “no sex” side. Yes, the book does get a bit steamy, but there is never explicit sex.

“But teens already know everything about sex,” I’ve been told.

Okay, that might be the case, but it doesn’t mean every young adult book has to contain graphic sex scenes. I want my books to be more about the adventure and setting than erotica.

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Photo by Anderson Weiss on Pexels.com

Jordan Elizabeth is a young adult fantasy author who dapples in the steampunk realm.  You can connect with Jordan via her website, JordanElizabethBooks.com.


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Writing for a YA Audience: Writing about a Dollhouse

Writing for a Y.A. Audience

Dollhouses have always intrigued me.  That and steampunk, but we’ll get to that later.

As a child, I had three dollhouses.  One was wooden, made by my maternal grandfather.  One was metal.  I used it for my Little People.  The third was plastic and I used it for my Victorian Playmobile set (I still feel bad that I never got the official dollhouse that went with the sets!).  I loved setting up the rooms and just looking at them.  My dolls didn’t always move around in them.  It was more for show.  I used my imagination to act out scenes.

There’s another dollhouse that sticks out in my mind, only I didn’t own it.  As a child, my mother and I went through an estate sale in the neighborhood.  In the basement, there was a dollhouse built to replicate the actual house.  I fell in love with it.  Unfortunately, it was expensive.  It was old and showed the effects of being in a basement.  Plus, it didn’t fit through the door!  I can still picture that dollhouse to this day.  I became obsessed with having an intricate dollhouse just like that one.

My grandmother bought me a wooden dollhouse kit.  It came with working windows, shingles, and a drainpipe.  It also came with a bit of trouble – none of us were carpentry inclined.  The dollhouse sat in its box in my basement for years.  Eventually, my then-boyfriend (now husband) attempted to put it together, but didn’t get farther than popping out the pieces.  A few years ago, a friend’s husband put it together.  It looks just as amazing as I’d always hoped it would.

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My mother and I bought wallpaper, wainscoting, furniture, dolls… We’re in love with it, but we haven’t done too much decoration-wise.  Some of the furniture came in sets and we already know we’re horrible at putting sets together.  This dollhouse, sitting on the hall table, with its beautiful dolls keeps pulling at my imagination.  I wanted to create a story about a dollhouse, one with secrets.  Since I love the steampunk genre, I wanted to add in a taste of that.   Thus, along came CLOCKWORK DOLLHOUSE, a short story about dolls and secrets.

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Have you ever seen a dollhouse that beckoned you into its walls?

Jordan Elizabeth is a young adult fantasy author.  If you have any spooky dollhouse furniture you want to part with, she would be happy to take it off your hands! You can connect with Jordan  via her website, JordanElizabethBooks.com.

 

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“Rogue Crystal”: A YA Science Fantasy Adventure

Rogue Crystal

Rogue Crystal, by Jordan Elizabeth is a futuristic science fantasy adventure novel featuring magic weilding aliens and an unsuspecting heroine, who may be the key to saving the world, with several surprise twists along the way. Both science fiction and fantasy fans will enjoy this story, as it has elements from both genres.

Avery thought a trip to Scarya, a secret rendevous with her boyfriend diguised as a journey to the country of her ancestral origins for her parents benefit, would be a great time. But when her cousin’s archeology team uncovers a sword which draws her to it and then disappears, things begin to get a little freaky. Suddenly, it seems that everyone is after her and she doesn’t know who to trust. Except for DeClan, her boyfriend and long time sweetheart, whom she trusts explicitely. But something isn’t right. His uncnny ability to show up just when needed and his unconditional acceptance of what Avery tells him, no matter how strange or unusual makes the reader wonder if he might not be what he appears to be, as they uncover a centuries old family history of alien origins and a struggle to save the world. While all this is a little unsettling, it’s nothing compared to Avery’s surprise when she learns that she holds the crystal which holds the power to destroy the world.

This story combines elements of science fiction and fantasy into a well crafted adventure which fans of both genres can enjoy. I give Rogue Crystal four quills.

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Kaye Lynne Booth does honest book reviews on Writing to be Read in exchange for ARCs. Have a book you’d like reviewed? Contact Kaye at kayebooth(at)yahoo(dot)com.