“Gyre”: A Science Fiction Fantasy Romance novel worth reading

Gyre

Gyre, by Jessica Gunn is the first book in her Atlas Link series. It is the story of Chelsea, a descendent of Atlantis, who is just discovering her amazing powers and Trevor, a Lemurian descendent, who should be her mortal enemy, but instead falls for her in a big way. See? Boy meets girl, but there is no way they can be together, yet they will fight against all the odds, and even against family to prove them all wrong. Now if that isn’t the recipe for a perfect romance, I don’t know what is. As they are traveling aboard a top secret naval submarine complete with cloak, I think Gunn has the science fiction elements and Lemurians and Atlanteans with super powers pretty much covers the fantasy realm. If it sounds confusing, read the book. It’s actually a pretty good genre combination.

Chelsea is discovering her powers. First super strength, which she was able to ignore, or deny, but now she keeps teleporting to a location near Trevor any time she gets stressed. The problem is, Trevor is on a top secret U.S. Naval Sub cruising the ocean depths, but on that vessel also may lie the answers to Chelsea’s unasked questions about who she is really and she might learn to control her newfound powers. Unlike Chelsea, Trevor is aware of his heritage as a Lemurian, but he refuses to get involved in the war his people are wageing with the Atlanteans. He just can’t believe the girl he’s falling for is his innate enemy, and he’s able to keep it all under control until they find an Atlantean outpost filled with valuable artifacts on the ocean floor. It seems everybody wants those artifacts for their own reasons, and we can only guess who will get them, and where Chelsea will end up.

This story is well-written, with minimal telling of the tale. The characters are likeable, except for Trevor’s friend and fellow Lemurian, Valerie, who is a bit difficult to figure out, but I think that’s done on purpose to throw readers off the trail. I give Gyre four quills.

four-quills3

 

Kaye Lynne Booth does honest book reviews on Writing to be Read in exchange for ARCs at no charge. Have a book you’d like reviewed? Contact Kaye at kayebooth(at)yahoo(dot)com.

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Ask the Authors: Genre Differences

genres

 My first semester in the M.F.A. program at Western, we were assigned to write an excerpt in a genre outside of that in which we normally write. I was assigned the western genre, and while I’d never really written much in the western genre, I learned from that exercise that I was pretty good at writing westerns, and that excerpt became part of my first published novel, Delilah. Now I’m working on the sequel, and even though the western genre is not as popular as it once was, I enjoy writing westerns, and for me, that may be more important than how many I sell. (But, how many I sell is important, don’t get me wrong. I want ton be a best seller as much as the next author.) I could never be a literary writer. Hell, I can’t even read all the way through some literary novels. While I have a knack for the western genre, I also have available Last Call, which is a sci-fi short and my paranormal mystery, Hidden Secrets. I guess that makes me a multi-genre author.

Today Ask the Authors is going to talk about some of the genres and what makes them different. We’ll also look at what kind of things we do differently when writing in more than one genre, regarding the writing process, research and marketing. Without further ado, let’s see what our panel members have to say.

Which genres do you write?

DeAnna Knippling: Most of them.
Jordan Elizabeth:  My books are all young adult with a touch of fantasy.  Some of the books involve fantasy creatures.  Others feature ghosts.
Carol Riggs: I write mostly fantasy and science fiction. However, I approach those genres with a light touch; I think they’re more accessible to a wider range of readers that way, rather than saturated (high) fantasy or hard sci-fi.

Tim Baker: I really don’t know what my genre is – or if I actually can be placed into only one. Generally speaking I write fast-paced, tongue in cheek, semi- humorous crime novels. I have also taken that description and coupled it with supernatural themes. My latest novel is pretty much a suspense-thriller, but it is still fast-paced with very small doses of humor.

For the purposes of this segment – let’s just say I write crime novels.

Cynthia Vespia: I write speculative fiction for adults and teens. For those who don’t know what speculative fiction is, it is  a broad literary genre encompassing any fiction with supernatural, fantastical, or futuristic elements. Often described as the ‘What if?’ genre, speculative fiction is distinguished by being based on unusual ideas and elevated imagination.

I write a combination of urban fantasy, dark fantasy, magical realism, supernatural, paranormal, superhero, and dystopian. Which is why I started to go under the umbrella of speculative fiction because it encompasses all of that. I’ve dabbled in horror, and I’m trying my hand at space-opera, but those aren’t my main genres.

Janet Garber: I’ve written and published in multiple genres: journalism, non-fiction book, book and movie reviews, essays, short stories, novels, poetry, sci-fi/spec, humor. About the only thing I haven’t tried yet is screenwriting.  I’ve also got a number of children’s stories and I would love to put them together in a book someday.

Chris Barili: I write in every genre. I think the story and the characters dictate the genre, so rather than starting out to write a fantasy novel or a western short story, I set out with a character and a problem and let things go from there. With the acceptance of a story of mine to a new crime fiction magazine, I have now sold fiction in all the major genres: Fantasy, SF, Horror, western, romance, and crime. I write most of my stuff in the speculative fiction genres of fantasy and horror. In the end, a story’s a story, no matter the label we stick on it.

Follow-Up for YA authors: You write YA, but you write different genres under that umbrella: steampunk, fantasy, maybe even sci-fi. To my way of thinking your genres should be labled YA steampunk, YA fantasy, YA sci-fi, YA romance, etc… You may not have the answer for how this practice of clumping all the genres under one YA umbrella came about, but what are your thoughts on it?
Carol Riggs:  Here’s my off-the-cuff answer to that:

I think clumping everything under just “YA” is pretty limiting and doesn’t tell the reader much info. Technically, as many editors and agents point out, YA is simply an age category, for readers 12-18 (and up) and involves main characters who are usually between the ages of 14 to 18. The actual GENRE is a dividing into things like steampunk, fantasy, sci-fi, historical, graphic novel, etc. But it’s very handy to have labels like “YA steampunk” because then you get the age category listed as well as the genre.

Dark Western Fantasy

Dark Western Fantasy

Each genre has certain elements which readers pick up a book expecting to find within the story. Romance tropes are probably some of the most familiar: there are two characters, they often start out disliking one another, to spite all odds they fall in love, but there are obstacles to overcome for them to be together, and of course, there must be a Happy Ever After. These are the elements of romance, and without them we don’t have much of a story. This is what romance readers expect to get when they pick up a romance novel. Its what they want, and if you don’t deliver, your reader following is liable go find another author who does.

I’m sure you’ll all recognize the tropes for the western genre as well: you have a lone character who stands up for what’s right against high odds, and must battle against the environment to complete their journey. There is a certain time period in history in which the western must occur, after (1700s?). I optioned to go against a trope of the genre when I made my protagonist female, but by giving her a romantic interest, I crossed over into the romance genre, therefore widening my audience scope. Let’s see how our panelist handle the tropes of their genres.

What are the more well-known tropes of your genre(s)?
Tim Baker: Tropes? Wow – I had to look up what a trope was!! So you basically mean clichés? This is difficult for me to answer because, as I said, I don’t neatly fit into a set genre, but as far as crime novels go I guess the biggest tropes would be the hero with the deep dark secret in his past, or the villain who is hell-bent on avenging an egregious wrong perpetrated upon him by “the man”. There is also the ever-popular femme-fatale as well as the buddy concept, where two characters are thrust together against their will and have to work together…then end up being best friends.
Cynthia Vespia: In every genre the readership of that specific genre is expecting certain elements to be included, which is what drew them to the genre in the first place. It is the job of the author to deliver those expectations. Whether its pacing, character, or story there are certain approaches to each genre. I’m just aware of including those elements while I’m writing a book.
Janet Garber: My female protagonists tend to be slightly neurotic, soulful, fighting for their lives in one way or another. My villains are like dementors, sucking all the air and light and creativity out of everyone they come in contact with. It’s easy to love the hero or heroine and detest the villain. I will say that usually I’m too soft on my characters, don’t let loose on them as much as I should, and insist on happy endings. I guess I write the kind of stories I want to read.
Chris Barili: Since I write in all of them, this would take most of the rest of the day for me to answer, but tropes are kind of outdated now in many genres thanks to the crossover between them. Urban fantasy, for example, has different tropes than fantasy or urban adventure kinds of stories.
Horror.Women.Parnormal Romance

Horror, Women’s Fiction and Paranormal Romance

How much do you think about the tropes of your genre while you are writing?
DeAnna Knippling: Hmmm…I study the tropes, but I don’t think about them much, other than when they annoy me.   I try to focus more on what the reader actually wants to feel, although I might get excited about some set piece that I want to include, especially for my ghostwriting projects.  “I get to go to Paris!  I don’t want to take people to the Eiffel tower…but we are TOTALLY going into the back of this cafe and making crepes.”  Stuff like that.
Jordan Elizabeth: I don’t while I’m writing.  I don’t really think about them at all until someone makes a comment in a review.  I’ll read it and think “huh, I guess so?”
Carol Riggs: I basically know the tropes and I know some people are eager to see those tropes; it’s part of the genres. However, I like to be original and if I do include a trope, I try to put a fresh spin on it. I do this mostly when outlining my novels before I begin, but also when I’m considering a plot twist.
Tim Baker: I think about them constantly because I try to avoid them. I try to make my stories and characters as “real” as possible.
Chris Barili: Consciously – not at all. Subconsciously, my experience reading across genres helps a lot. They tend to insert themselves once the story gets rolling.
Crime Novels

Crime Novels

Even when writing fiction, there’s a certain amount of research required, and the type of research may depend on the type of story you are writing. For the western genre, I did quite a bit of research into Colorado history and the old west in general. For Delilah, I also researched specific details, such as the different types of rifles available during the timeline of the story and the attributes and features of each, and how long it takes to travel certain distances on horseback or by wagon. For other genres, these details would be of no interest, but other things would be more relevant, so the type of research will vary between genres. Our panel members write a wide variety of genres. Let’s Ask the Authors what kinds of things they research.
What kind of research do you do for your genre(s)?
DeAnna Knippling: I’m trying to tackle the top 100 books in a genre before I try to write in it.  Sometimes with the ghostwriting I get overcome by events.
Jordan Elizabeth: I try not to research fantasy creatures, because I want mine to be original.  The only research I’ll do involves historical content.  Many of my stories flash back to a time in history.  Escape From Witchwood Hollow follows three girls.  One is in the 1600’s, one in the 1800’s, and one in the 2000’s. 
Carol Riggs: It really depends on the book. The sci-fi genre demands more real, science-related research. For instance, for my latest sci-fi I researched things like assault drones, concealed carry laws, hoverboards, pepper spray, and how to get over or through a barbed wire fence. For fantasy, I find myself often researching medieval kinds of things—what hut roofs are made of, how fast horses travel, etc.
Tim Baker: I’m not big on research. I try to write stories that don’t require it, or require very little. Most of my research consists of observing life.
Cynthia Vespia: It depends what type of story I’m writing. Most of my research is for location, weapons, or mythology like monsters etc.
Janet Garber: I would say I’m light on research. Mostly I draw upon people I’ve encountered casually, places I’ve passed through, choices I could have made. The road not taken.  It always intrigues me that decisions we make at certain times in our lives have such long-lasting results. No wonder we obsess about doing the right thing.
Chris Barili: Genre research is just plain reading. I try to read across a broad spectrum of genres. I’m currently reading a crime novel, Dead Stop, by my friend Barbara Nickless. Before that, I was reading a zombie anthology edited by Jonathan Maberry. And on my TBR pile I see SF, fantasy, romance, and a weird western.
Margareth Stewart: I do lots of research – on time, place, suitable names for characters, historical data, language and how people relate to one another. As I read various genres, every piece of information is important. Besides, when I am writing a new genre, I read the top writers of that field to figure out their style. For writers, I should say research is the beginning and the final proof  we are in the right direction. It makes our writing real – to a point that sometimes readers even inquire me: “Have you not met Pierre (main character of Open)? Don’t you tell me he is not real?”. It is unbelievable – our ability to make up stories and a fiction world.
Steampunk.Knippling and Elizabeth

Steampunk

What came to be The Great Primordial Battle, Book 1 in the PfG series, was my thesis project, so it had detailed planning. I had so much detail that it couldn’t all be contained in one book. I had outlined the story, and charted out so much backstory and extremely complicated lineage for my characters, and since my characters can appear in different personas at different times, I charted all of those too. In fact, I had so  much detail, I couldn’t possibly fit it all into one book, and I had to restructure the whole thing into a four book series. I had never done such detailed research and planning before. Although I did do a lot of research for Delilah, the plotting wasn’t nearly as detailed and or complex. Whether that is due to differences in genres, or to multiple POVs vs single POV, I cannot say. Perhaps both make their contributions.
With all the different types of research that comes with writing in each genre, we have to wonder about other differences. Do we go through the same writing process when crafting a science fiction story that we do to create a romance? Don’t forget too, that we can have a story that falls into one genre with elements of other genres intermixed, such Jordan Elizabeth’s Treasure series, which is steampunk with a western style setting, or a story that crosses genres like Chris Barili’s B.T. Clearwater paranormal romance, Smothered, or my Playground for the Gods series, which is science fantasy. Let’s see what our panel members think.
If you write more than one genre, in what ways does your writing process differ for different genres?
DeAnna Knippling: Butt in chair, fingers on keyboard, headphones on ears?
Carol Riggs: With both fantasy and sci-fi, I get to use my imagination a lot, which is why I love those genres. I adore making stuff up. In general, I make up less stuff for sci-fi, because the tech and world details are more rooted in science and reality.
Janet Garber: Much of my work is humorous. I love to do a story with  echoes of Twilight Zone and scary stories (no gore though. I abhor gore). My serious fiction tends to concern itself with identity, coming of age, women who are trapped in one way or another and fighting to break free.
Chris Barili: The process itself remains the same, but how much time is spent on things like world building, character sketches, outlines, and so on varies a bit based on genre.
YA Fantasy and Science Fiction

YA Fantasy and Science Fiction

Different genres appeal to different audiences, so it really helps to know who you’re writing for and which markets you should aim your advertising and promotional efforts at. I believe it also can affect which categories your book appears in on the Amazon rankings, but that’s an area that I am still in the process of learning about, so I’m not in the position to partake in that discussion yet. But, perhaps we can learn a thing or two from the experiences of our panel members.
How do you think the marketing and promotion for your genre(s) differs?  
Jordan Elizabeth: I know erotica is easier to promote.  People eat it up like candy.  Young adult fiction is harder.  Most of the ads and newsletter swaps go to adults, not teens.  Usually that’s okay, because adults enjoy young adult fiction, but its hard to market directly to teens.
Carol Riggs: You’re marketing to different audiences, people with different tastes. The kinds of promo images for fantasy and sci-fi will be greatly different than for a contemporary novel or a romance novel, for instance. The websites and places you might promo on would be different. There are different conventions a writer could tap into and attend (or speak at), such as Comic Con or a sci-fi convention.
Obviously, each book’s Amazon categories are different, to give best visibility to a title. I haven’t done so, but I could select different conventions or even different book stores to do signings at. I think posters and images are strong things to use, and can draw people across a room to you and your book. This means your images (especially book covers) need to capture the genre well.
Tim Baker:  I don’t think it does. I am not marketing my genre – I am marketing my books to anybody who can read – as I’m sure other authors do as well. I understand that all genres have a core audience, but those people will be there regardless of your marketing techniques. It’s the rest of the people we should all be trying to reach.
Cynthia Vespia: Marketing and promotion is very specific for each genre and that’s due to the readership. I feel as though romance and erotica have a really large readership, where some other genres may not be as large. For example westerns aren’t that popular any more so if that’s the genre you’re writing in then it might feel a little tougher. Because I write in the fantasy realm alot I found I can cross-promote with alot of commercial vehicles such as different conventions, movie/TV tie-ins, etc.
Janet Garber: Journalism is easy in comparison to other genres. You get an assignment to do an interview or column or essay, submit it on the deadline and usually see it published very soon afterward. At that point you let your fans know the article has come out. All other genres: it’s a question of experimenting with getting the word out on your website, blog, facebook, etc., running ads perhaps, doing book signings and readings in bookstores and libraries. It’s trial and error until you figure out what works.
Margareth Stewart: Oh, places may vary, but strategies remain the same – creating connection to all possible readers. Different readers are found at different places – we have to search for them. A good example is what I did for “Open/Pierre´s journey after war”. I sent book release and marketing material to WWII discussion groups in the internet. I also placed articles about it in War Blogs and I still keep constantly trying to find people who are interested in WWII. We – writers – have to develop the ability to create connections with people who are related to our topics and genres (all the time).
Dark Fantasy.Western Steampunk

Dark Fantasy and Western Steampunk

If you write in more than one genre, what do you do with your marketing to tap into the different audiences?
Janet Garber: Since I used to be a serious person, a business and career writer, and still am occasionally, I attend annual conferences in my field, contribute to LinkedIn, try to network a bit with other professionals. I will have a new novel coming out which is not humorous, not about HR or the corporate world and I’m wondering just how I will promote it. It definitely falls into the Women’s Fiction rubrique and thematically ties into some of the stories I have written and published. I hope I get some brainstorms about how to promote it when it’s ready for publication!
One of the biggest pieces of advice I hear as far as genres go is to read everything you can get your hands on in the genre you’re planning to write. This, not only helps you to know the tropes for your genre, but also makes you familiar with what is already out there. It doesn’t seem like genre makes a lot of difference when it comes to the writing process, but it does affect the types and amounts of research we must do, and the markets we aim advertising efforts toward. Be sure and drop in next Monday when our panel members will discuss the business end of writing. It should be a great segment, so don’t miss it.
 

If you have a question you’ve always wanted answered, but it’s not covered in the post on that topic, or if our panel’s answers have stirred new questions within you, pose your query in the comments. Make note if it is directed toward a specific author. Questions will be directed to the general panel unless otherwise specified. Then, in the final post for the series, I will present your questions and the responses I recieved from panel members.

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“Strange Attractors”: a strange attractor in its own right

Strange Attractors

I’m not sure how to classify Strange Attractors by Mark Todd. It is science fiction, but it doesn’t feel like science fiction. It feels like a story with well-developed characters you want to care about and an intricate plot, filled with irony, which keeps you guessing until the very last pages. Most of all, I think Strange Attractors is simply an interesting and entertaining read, a good, old fashioned, well crafted story that keeps the pages turning.

Conti is Morgan’s boss, but when she learns that the project she’s been working on has the potential to wipe out world populations, and has potential military applications, she wonders if her boss is losing his mind. And perhaps he is. Conti has seen little gray men near Roswell, but they aren’t what he thinks. Morgan is seeing one too, in the form of a little boy who looks strangely like her little brother. Although he shows her many things, including a strange craft, Morgan doesn’t believe in aliens, so she gives these things a different interpretation. When Morgan confronts her boss about her suspicions on the project, he seems to give her the brush off, and before all is through, Morgan doesn’t know who to trust. She’s sure the little boy who appears both in and out of her dreams is trying to tell her something, and it could be something that could change the fate of the world, but can she figure out his message while there is still time to avert disaster?

I enjoyed every page of this story. I was drawn to it as if to a strange attractor, something attractive and compelling. I give Strange Attractors five quills.

Five Quills3


“Pangaea: Eden’s Planet”- A Science Fiction Odyssey

Pangaea

Pangaea: Eden’s Planet, by Tom Johnson is a science fiction story that engaged me through to the last page, offering me food for thought in some of my own writings. It is well crafted with an entertaining plot and characters that I grew to like in the brief time it took me to read it.

On a routine mission to ready Mars for colonization,  a space anomoly sends their spaceship back to prehistoric Earth instead. Stuck in a hostile land before the existence of man or dinosaurs, the crew does their best to make the best of things. But faced with poisonous plants and animals, along with huge and vicious carnivores, the crew is dwindling. How can they survive?

The third person omnicient P.O.V. is always a little off-putting for me, but Tom Johnson crafts the story well and really does a nice job of pulling this viewpoint off. While there were a few logic problems, they weren’t so severe that I couldn’t buy in to this excellent plot and story line. The only thing I couldn’t overlook was the use of varied dialog tags, some which were distracting, actually pulling me out of the story.

Pangaea: Eden’s Planet is an engaging tale crafted with thought and skill. I  give it four quills.

Four Quills3


“Darkscapes”: Stories That Will Keep You Reading

Darkscapes

Darkscapes is a top quality anthology of short stories put out by Curiosity Quills Press. I must say, this anthology delivers on the promise of the premise. The title says that the stories within may be on the darker side of things, where danger lays hidden beneath the layers of the mind’s eye. The cover image tells me I’m in for some rather unusual stories, ones that go to places which may defy logic. And, having read many books produced by Curiosity Quills Press, the fact that they published this book says it’s a collection of good quality, well-written stories. And that my friends, is exactly what I got – all of the above.

There are twenty-one stories contained in this collection, too many to be able to discuss all of them here. So, I will give you a brief overview of the six, yes six, stories which I deemed to deserve a five quill rating, meaning the authors of these stories have done an exemplary job of storytelling. Keep in mind that these stories are the best of the best in this collection, but all of them are good reading.

The first story in the anthology, Exley Avenue, is an extremely well-written ghost story of sorts, with a surprise ending. Going between the 1920’s and the twenty-first century, storytellers Jordan Elizabeth and W.K. Pomeroy unravel the unsavory history of the stone castle on Exley Avenue, when several bodies are uncovered on the premises.

Further into the collection is a cute noirish story, with an unlikely P.I. for a protagonist, which is sure to keep you chuckling until the end is Skeleton Jim, by J.R. Rain. Noir with humor is the only way to describe this bizarre tale. But, rest assured, Skeleton Jim always gets his man, (and the girl, for some reason). Things are no different when the client, Lucy Newman, hires him to find out if she killed her abusive husband, and who is blackmailing her, Jim may have his work cut out for him. No bones about it. (Skeleton humor. Har, har, har.)

Then, there is The Giovanni Effect, by Robert J. Defendi, an extremely well-crafted story with excellent world building. Readers will live this one. On a desert outpost planet where sand and wind are constants, Allred and his wife and child are the planets only occupants. They’ve always known others might come, but when a ship lands on the planet Allred is forced to put their emergency plans to the test. The planet’s harsh atmosphere may be the death of him, or it might just be his savior.

The forth story, Landing a Job in the Private Sector, by Rena Rocford, kept the pages turning with the best of them. Furies are conditioned assassins, but when Boxy, an enslaved fury acquires an organic ship that is loyal to her, and becomes a rogue mercenary, she learns that everything is negotiable, even under pressure.

The fifth five quill story is Out of Sight, by Mathew S. Cox. Sima is a street kid, who wakes up to find she’s been relocated to another planet and her pod crashed. She all alone, with no supplies, no clothes and no idea where she is. But then she discovers three other children who were sent here, as well, and she has more to worry about than just her own survival.

The One You Feed, by Katie Young was the last story in this collection to fall into my best of the best list. This was a well-written werewolf story, which left me wanting more. Dupree is haunted by more than just werewolves. As he spins his tale for the cowboy he just hired on with at the last rodeo, we learn more about the ghosts who haunt his past, and the curse that controls his future.

The above mentioned stories are, in my opinion, the best stories in this collection. However, they are all entertaining tales. I wouldn’t rate any of the stories in this collection with less than three quills. They really are that good. The smashing cast of talented authors whose work appears in this anthology also includes: Richard Roberts, Ann M. Noser, Randy Attwood, Nathan Croft, Tegan Wren, James Wymore, J.P. Sloan, Andrew Buckley, Darin Kennedy, J.E. Anckorn, Piers Anthony, B.C. Johnson, S.E. Bennett, Mark W. Woodring, and Benjamin Sperduto.

Four Quills3

Overall, I give Darkscapes four quills.

 

Kaye Lynne Booth does honest book reviews on Writing to be Read in exchange for ARCs at no charge. Have a book you’d like reviewed? Contact Kaye at kayebooth(at)yahoo(dot)com.


Interview with “The Best Seller”author Dina Rae

dins

Today, we have with us, the science fiction author of the conspiracy thriller, The Best Seller, Dina Rae. She’s tried both the traditional publishing and self-publishing routes, and her latest novel, The Best Seller, was recently released by Solstice Publishing. With this interview, we kick off her book blog tour with Full Moon Bites author promotions.

Kaye: Your latest science fiction conspiracy thriller, The Best Seller: Book 1 of 2 was recently released. It is the tale of a writer’s dream come true, turned nightmare. Would you like to talk about that? Tell us what it’s all about.

Dina: I thought it would be interesting to write about a Stephen King-like author who doesn’t write his work, but records it from extraterrestrials.  I once listened to a podcast that talked about automatic writing that comes from the Akashic record and thought it would play well in a novel.  Of course, the author doesn’t live happily ever after.  That would make for a short, boring book.  There’s a reason for it as you read on.  My next novel, The Sequel, gets more into it.

Kaye: You’re a wife and mother in addition to being a writer. What are your secrets for juggling writing with family?

Dina: I also work full-time as a teacher and coach, so yes, it’s a lot to juggle!  I bring a notebook with me at all times.  When I am waiting at the dentist, it’s time to write; when I am waiting for noodles to boil, it’s time to write; when I am at a choir concert or softball game; it’s time to write…  You can always find time to do the things you love to do.  I wish I was that determined when it comes to working out!  I have found that the most productive people on the planet are the ones who have no time.  Ask the busiest person you know to do something and it’s done!

Kaye: What is the one thing you hope to teach your children?

Dina: Great question!  I want them to be good people, but also know that it is okay to mess up.  It’s okay to take a risk and fail.  Learning from mistakes is not just a lesson, but a way to live your life.  I want them to understand the value of a dollar.  So many young people start out their lives in massive debt from college.  Life’s expenses cause more debt.  My college-aged daughters decided to attend junior college and work as a way to keep expenses down.  They might just graduate debt free.  They both have friends who already are in massive debt and have yet to graduate.

bestseller (1)

Kaye: Your books are filled with conspiracies and intrigue. A lot of your books don’t fit neatly into a genre category or subcategory. How do you describe your books?

Dina: I love a good conspiracy-left-wing, right-wing, alien, HAARP, contrails, 911, apocalypse, bring it on!  All of my books take kernels of popular conspiracies and then build stories around them.  The Best Seller delves into how the government not only knows about extraterrestrials, but partners up with them to maintain power.  Of course, a humongous conspiracy always has a few that go rogue which messes up the plan.  I also take the Roswell incident and fill in the blanks about how our government found a spaceship and aliens in New Mexico back in 1947.  In The Sequel, The Best Seller’s second volume, there is a great deal of conspiracy about Hitler and his Nazis.

Kaye: You do a lot of research in order to write about things you haven’t ever seen and places you’ve never been? What are some of the strangest things you’ve ever had to research for your books?

Dina: In The Sequel, I spent a great deal of time researching races of aliens.  David Icke’s name popped a few million times.  Very, very strange.  He believes a Reptillian race lives on earth among us.  They shapeshift into key figures of the elite circle.  These Reptillians prepare for New World Order.  I loved it!  He is very sincere in his beliefs as are the many who follow him.

Kaye: Are you a plotter or a pantser? Why?

Dina: I am a total pantser for the first half of the book.  I start plotting later on, and then go back to change everything!  I tend to work better without an outline.

Kaye: You’ve made some pretty awesome book trailers, which do a good job of capturing readers’ attention, but how effective have they been as far as selling books goes?

Dina: Thanks so much!  The truth is the trailers do not generate a lot of hits.  They are something that I will keep doing anyway.  I think that I get most of my sales from interviews of bloggers and radio hosts.  I also will have selling spurts after a great review from a review blog.

Kaye: If writing suddenly made you rich and famous, what would you do?

Dina:  I would love to find out!  I have everything that I want in a middle-class capacity.  Extra money would mean lots of traveling.

Kaye: What’s the most fun part of writing a novel? What’s the least fun part?

Dina: Most fun-I oddly love to research.  I also love putting the pieces together for the story-it’s like a puzzle.  Yes, I am a geek!  Least fun-editing and constantly promoting.

Kaye: What did your road to publication look like? How did you get to where you are today?

Dina: My first book was The Last Degree.  My publisher was not entirely on the up and up.  I didn’t know any better.  I pulled the manuscript and canceled the contract.  The book is now up on Amazon as self-published.  My second book and third books, Halo of the Damned and Halo of the Nephilim, had much smoother rides.  They were published by Damnation Books.  They recently sold the business to another publisher, Caliburn Books.  The Best Seller was picked up by Solstice Publishing and they have been great.  The got back to me right away after my query.  I signed and then they gave me a cover.  While it was being edited, I started promoting the book.

My advice to new writers is this-check out Preditors and Editors.  They keep tabs on the publishing world.  Also know that not everyone is legit.

Kaye: Is there anything unique or unusual about your writing process?

Dina: Not really, but I do like to write longhand.  I like to buy cool looking journals to write in.

Kaye: What is the strangest inspiration for a story you’ve ever had?

Dina: It’s certainly not an original idea, but genetic modifications, cloning, CRISP-R, and gene therapy scare the hell out of me.  Fear of the future inspires me.  I don’t see the progress, I see the pitfalls.

Kaye: What do you like to do when you’re not writing?

Dina: I love to play tennis and walk my two dogs.  My husband and I also love to go to flea markets for fun.

Kaye: What is the biggest challenge of being a writer for you?

Dina: There are so many challenges.  Advertising is so expensive.  Authors have to be more creative in their promotions.  There is a lot of trial and error.

Kaye: If you could have lunch with any author, alive or dead, who would it be?  Why?

Dina: Jesus Christ/God because I believe they wrote the Bible.  Meeting them would mean I made it into Heaven.  On a less divine note, I would love to talk to Shakespeare (or Queen Elizabeth as some conspiracy theories claim is the real author of all of those plays).  I want to know how it feels to have so many of your phrases used in today’s language.  I would want to know how he feels about modern literature.

Thanks so much for interviewing me!  Great questions!

I want to thank you, Dina, for sharing with myself and my readers a small glimpse into your life and your writing. I’m sure The Best Seller will be… a best seller, and I’m pleased to be able to help kick off your tour.

You can follow Dina here:

@haloofthedamned
Blog: http://www.dinaraeswritestuff.blogspot.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/30286767-the-best-seller

Facebook

 

See Her Book Trailers Here:

The Best Seller: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQER8wJmaf8
The Last Degree: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkbg6Yy8UKU
Halo of the Damned: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4p89LXZNxOs

 

Dina is also hosting a give away for 2 signed paperbacks of The Best Seller, and 2 Amazon $10.00 gift cards. You can enter the give away here:

http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/873c06d2357/?

 

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“The Lying Planet”: Only The Truth Will Set Them Free

The Lying Planet

The Lying Planet, by Carol Riggs is a grabbing YA science fiction novel. Riggs puts a new twist on the story where all is not as it appears. On the planet Liberty, the future seems bright, but when the truth is finally unveiled, it may be very dark indeed.

On the planet Liberty, kids look forward to turning eighteen and venturing out of the colony they grew up in, away from their families, to live lives of their own. Jay can’t wait to gain his freedom. But what’s a kid to do when he discovers that everything he was ever lead to believe is a lie, the very fabric that he’s built his life on is false? Jay uncovers a secret that will change life on Liberty forever, and once he knows the truth, there’s no turning back.

Riggs brings us action and suspense in a well crafted YA science fiction novel which is filled with surprises. Just when you think you have it all figured out, another twist is added. I give The Lying Planet five quills.

Five Quills3