“The Pain and the Sorrow”: Historic Fiction at its Best

The Pain and the Sorrow

The Pain and the Sorrow is a western which takes a true historic tale and crafts the details to the in a way that makes Loretta Miles Tollefson’s rendering not only plausible, but probable. Her background as a journalist is evident in every historic detail included, and in the Author’s Note at the end, she offers up the discrepancies in the reported facts and her reasoning for the choices made as she crafted the details into this heart wrenching New Mexico legend to make it come alive. It gripped me and I didn’t want to put it down. I couldn’t wait for the story to unfold.

From the view point of a young New Mexican girl, the story takes on a feeling of sadness in addition to the unbelievable horror of the originally reported events. Charles Kennedy offered food and lodging to weary travelers in the mountains of New Mexico for a price, but Charles had a temper and a lust for money, and those who stopped there didn’t always leave. Charles was an old west version of a serial killer. So claimed his young wife, Gregoria, when she appeared in a saloon in Etown one night after walking ten miles in the bitter cold to get away from her abusive husband.

A western with a female perspective, attention to the historic details, a story that compels me to keep the pages turning and characters that make me care. What more could this reader want? I give The Pain and the Sorrow five quills.

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Kaye Lynne Booth does honest book reviews on Writing to be Read in exchange for ARCs at no charge. Have a book you’d like reviewed? Contact Kaye at kayebooth(at)yahoo(dot)com.

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Ask the Authors: Genre Differences

genres

 My first semester in the M.F.A. program at Western, we were assigned to write an excerpt in a genre outside of that in which we normally write. I was assigned the western genre, and while I’d never really written much in the western genre, I learned from that exercise that I was pretty good at writing westerns, and that excerpt became part of my first published novel, Delilah. Now I’m working on the sequel, and even though the western genre is not as popular as it once was, I enjoy writing westerns, and for me, that may be more important than how many I sell. (But, how many I sell is important, don’t get me wrong. I want ton be a best seller as much as the next author.) I could never be a literary writer. Hell, I can’t even read all the way through some literary novels. While I have a knack for the western genre, I also have available Last Call, which is a sci-fi short and my paranormal mystery, Hidden Secrets. I guess that makes me a multi-genre author.

Today Ask the Authors is going to talk about some of the genres and what makes them different. We’ll also look at what kind of things we do differently when writing in more than one genre, regarding the writing process, research and marketing. Without further ado, let’s see what our panel members have to say.

Which genres do you write?

DeAnna Knippling: Most of them.
Jordan Elizabeth:  My books are all young adult with a touch of fantasy.  Some of the books involve fantasy creatures.  Others feature ghosts.
Carol Riggs: I write mostly fantasy and science fiction. However, I approach those genres with a light touch; I think they’re more accessible to a wider range of readers that way, rather than saturated (high) fantasy or hard sci-fi.

Tim Baker: I really don’t know what my genre is – or if I actually can be placed into only one. Generally speaking I write fast-paced, tongue in cheek, semi- humorous crime novels. I have also taken that description and coupled it with supernatural themes. My latest novel is pretty much a suspense-thriller, but it is still fast-paced with very small doses of humor.

For the purposes of this segment – let’s just say I write crime novels.

Cynthia Vespia: I write speculative fiction for adults and teens. For those who don’t know what speculative fiction is, it is  a broad literary genre encompassing any fiction with supernatural, fantastical, or futuristic elements. Often described as the ‘What if?’ genre, speculative fiction is distinguished by being based on unusual ideas and elevated imagination.

I write a combination of urban fantasy, dark fantasy, magical realism, supernatural, paranormal, superhero, and dystopian. Which is why I started to go under the umbrella of speculative fiction because it encompasses all of that. I’ve dabbled in horror, and I’m trying my hand at space-opera, but those aren’t my main genres.

Janet Garber: I’ve written and published in multiple genres: journalism, non-fiction book, book and movie reviews, essays, short stories, novels, poetry, sci-fi/spec, humor. About the only thing I haven’t tried yet is screenwriting.  I’ve also got a number of children’s stories and I would love to put them together in a book someday.

Chris Barili: I write in every genre. I think the story and the characters dictate the genre, so rather than starting out to write a fantasy novel or a western short story, I set out with a character and a problem and let things go from there. With the acceptance of a story of mine to a new crime fiction magazine, I have now sold fiction in all the major genres: Fantasy, SF, Horror, western, romance, and crime. I write most of my stuff in the speculative fiction genres of fantasy and horror. In the end, a story’s a story, no matter the label we stick on it.

Follow-Up for YA authors: You write YA, but you write different genres under that umbrella: steampunk, fantasy, maybe even sci-fi. To my way of thinking your genres should be labled YA steampunk, YA fantasy, YA sci-fi, YA romance, etc… You may not have the answer for how this practice of clumping all the genres under one YA umbrella came about, but what are your thoughts on it?
Carol Riggs:  Here’s my off-the-cuff answer to that:

I think clumping everything under just “YA” is pretty limiting and doesn’t tell the reader much info. Technically, as many editors and agents point out, YA is simply an age category, for readers 12-18 (and up) and involves main characters who are usually between the ages of 14 to 18. The actual GENRE is a dividing into things like steampunk, fantasy, sci-fi, historical, graphic novel, etc. But it’s very handy to have labels like “YA steampunk” because then you get the age category listed as well as the genre.

Dark Western Fantasy

Dark Western Fantasy

Each genre has certain elements which readers pick up a book expecting to find within the story. Romance tropes are probably some of the most familiar: there are two characters, they often start out disliking one another, to spite all odds they fall in love, but there are obstacles to overcome for them to be together, and of course, there must be a Happy Ever After. These are the elements of romance, and without them we don’t have much of a story. This is what romance readers expect to get when they pick up a romance novel. Its what they want, and if you don’t deliver, your reader following is liable go find another author who does.

I’m sure you’ll all recognize the tropes for the western genre as well: you have a lone character who stands up for what’s right against high odds, and must battle against the environment to complete their journey. There is a certain time period in history in which the western must occur, after (1700s?). I optioned to go against a trope of the genre when I made my protagonist female, but by giving her a romantic interest, I crossed over into the romance genre, therefore widening my audience scope. Let’s see how our panelist handle the tropes of their genres.

What are the more well-known tropes of your genre(s)?
Tim Baker: Tropes? Wow – I had to look up what a trope was!! So you basically mean clichés? This is difficult for me to answer because, as I said, I don’t neatly fit into a set genre, but as far as crime novels go I guess the biggest tropes would be the hero with the deep dark secret in his past, or the villain who is hell-bent on avenging an egregious wrong perpetrated upon him by “the man”. There is also the ever-popular femme-fatale as well as the buddy concept, where two characters are thrust together against their will and have to work together…then end up being best friends.
Cynthia Vespia: In every genre the readership of that specific genre is expecting certain elements to be included, which is what drew them to the genre in the first place. It is the job of the author to deliver those expectations. Whether its pacing, character, or story there are certain approaches to each genre. I’m just aware of including those elements while I’m writing a book.
Janet Garber: My female protagonists tend to be slightly neurotic, soulful, fighting for their lives in one way or another. My villains are like dementors, sucking all the air and light and creativity out of everyone they come in contact with. It’s easy to love the hero or heroine and detest the villain. I will say that usually I’m too soft on my characters, don’t let loose on them as much as I should, and insist on happy endings. I guess I write the kind of stories I want to read.
Chris Barili: Since I write in all of them, this would take most of the rest of the day for me to answer, but tropes are kind of outdated now in many genres thanks to the crossover between them. Urban fantasy, for example, has different tropes than fantasy or urban adventure kinds of stories.
Horror.Women.Parnormal Romance

Horror, Women’s Fiction and Paranormal Romance

How much do you think about the tropes of your genre while you are writing?
DeAnna Knippling: Hmmm…I study the tropes, but I don’t think about them much, other than when they annoy me.   I try to focus more on what the reader actually wants to feel, although I might get excited about some set piece that I want to include, especially for my ghostwriting projects.  “I get to go to Paris!  I don’t want to take people to the Eiffel tower…but we are TOTALLY going into the back of this cafe and making crepes.”  Stuff like that.
Jordan Elizabeth: I don’t while I’m writing.  I don’t really think about them at all until someone makes a comment in a review.  I’ll read it and think “huh, I guess so?”
Carol Riggs: I basically know the tropes and I know some people are eager to see those tropes; it’s part of the genres. However, I like to be original and if I do include a trope, I try to put a fresh spin on it. I do this mostly when outlining my novels before I begin, but also when I’m considering a plot twist.
Tim Baker: I think about them constantly because I try to avoid them. I try to make my stories and characters as “real” as possible.
Chris Barili: Consciously – not at all. Subconsciously, my experience reading across genres helps a lot. They tend to insert themselves once the story gets rolling.
Crime Novels

Crime Novels

Even when writing fiction, there’s a certain amount of research required, and the type of research may depend on the type of story you are writing. For the western genre, I did quite a bit of research into Colorado history and the old west in general. For Delilah, I also researched specific details, such as the different types of rifles available during the timeline of the story and the attributes and features of each, and how long it takes to travel certain distances on horseback or by wagon. For other genres, these details would be of no interest, but other things would be more relevant, so the type of research will vary between genres. Our panel members write a wide variety of genres. Let’s Ask the Authors what kinds of things they research.
What kind of research do you do for your genre(s)?
DeAnna Knippling: I’m trying to tackle the top 100 books in a genre before I try to write in it.  Sometimes with the ghostwriting I get overcome by events.
Jordan Elizabeth: I try not to research fantasy creatures, because I want mine to be original.  The only research I’ll do involves historical content.  Many of my stories flash back to a time in history.  Escape From Witchwood Hollow follows three girls.  One is in the 1600’s, one in the 1800’s, and one in the 2000’s. 
Carol Riggs: It really depends on the book. The sci-fi genre demands more real, science-related research. For instance, for my latest sci-fi I researched things like assault drones, concealed carry laws, hoverboards, pepper spray, and how to get over or through a barbed wire fence. For fantasy, I find myself often researching medieval kinds of things—what hut roofs are made of, how fast horses travel, etc.
Tim Baker: I’m not big on research. I try to write stories that don’t require it, or require very little. Most of my research consists of observing life.
Cynthia Vespia: It depends what type of story I’m writing. Most of my research is for location, weapons, or mythology like monsters etc.
Janet Garber: I would say I’m light on research. Mostly I draw upon people I’ve encountered casually, places I’ve passed through, choices I could have made. The road not taken.  It always intrigues me that decisions we make at certain times in our lives have such long-lasting results. No wonder we obsess about doing the right thing.
Chris Barili: Genre research is just plain reading. I try to read across a broad spectrum of genres. I’m currently reading a crime novel, Dead Stop, by my friend Barbara Nickless. Before that, I was reading a zombie anthology edited by Jonathan Maberry. And on my TBR pile I see SF, fantasy, romance, and a weird western.
Margareth Stewart: I do lots of research – on time, place, suitable names for characters, historical data, language and how people relate to one another. As I read various genres, every piece of information is important. Besides, when I am writing a new genre, I read the top writers of that field to figure out their style. For writers, I should say research is the beginning and the final proof  we are in the right direction. It makes our writing real – to a point that sometimes readers even inquire me: “Have you not met Pierre (main character of Open)? Don’t you tell me he is not real?”. It is unbelievable – our ability to make up stories and a fiction world.
Steampunk.Knippling and Elizabeth

Steampunk

What came to be The Great Primordial Battle, Book 1 in the PfG series, was my thesis project, so it had detailed planning. I had so much detail that it couldn’t all be contained in one book. I had outlined the story, and charted out so much backstory and extremely complicated lineage for my characters, and since my characters can appear in different personas at different times, I charted all of those too. In fact, I had so  much detail, I couldn’t possibly fit it all into one book, and I had to restructure the whole thing into a four book series. I had never done such detailed research and planning before. Although I did do a lot of research for Delilah, the plotting wasn’t nearly as detailed and or complex. Whether that is due to differences in genres, or to multiple POVs vs single POV, I cannot say. Perhaps both make their contributions.
With all the different types of research that comes with writing in each genre, we have to wonder about other differences. Do we go through the same writing process when crafting a science fiction story that we do to create a romance? Don’t forget too, that we can have a story that falls into one genre with elements of other genres intermixed, such Jordan Elizabeth’s Treasure series, which is steampunk with a western style setting, or a story that crosses genres like Chris Barili’s B.T. Clearwater paranormal romance, Smothered, or my Playground for the Gods series, which is science fantasy. Let’s see what our panel members think.
If you write more than one genre, in what ways does your writing process differ for different genres?
DeAnna Knippling: Butt in chair, fingers on keyboard, headphones on ears?
Carol Riggs: With both fantasy and sci-fi, I get to use my imagination a lot, which is why I love those genres. I adore making stuff up. In general, I make up less stuff for sci-fi, because the tech and world details are more rooted in science and reality.
Janet Garber: Much of my work is humorous. I love to do a story with  echoes of Twilight Zone and scary stories (no gore though. I abhor gore). My serious fiction tends to concern itself with identity, coming of age, women who are trapped in one way or another and fighting to break free.
Chris Barili: The process itself remains the same, but how much time is spent on things like world building, character sketches, outlines, and so on varies a bit based on genre.
YA Fantasy and Science Fiction

YA Fantasy and Science Fiction

Different genres appeal to different audiences, so it really helps to know who you’re writing for and which markets you should aim your advertising and promotional efforts at. I believe it also can affect which categories your book appears in on the Amazon rankings, but that’s an area that I am still in the process of learning about, so I’m not in the position to partake in that discussion yet. But, perhaps we can learn a thing or two from the experiences of our panel members.
How do you think the marketing and promotion for your genre(s) differs?  
Jordan Elizabeth: I know erotica is easier to promote.  People eat it up like candy.  Young adult fiction is harder.  Most of the ads and newsletter swaps go to adults, not teens.  Usually that’s okay, because adults enjoy young adult fiction, but its hard to market directly to teens.
Carol Riggs: You’re marketing to different audiences, people with different tastes. The kinds of promo images for fantasy and sci-fi will be greatly different than for a contemporary novel or a romance novel, for instance. The websites and places you might promo on would be different. There are different conventions a writer could tap into and attend (or speak at), such as Comic Con or a sci-fi convention.
Obviously, each book’s Amazon categories are different, to give best visibility to a title. I haven’t done so, but I could select different conventions or even different book stores to do signings at. I think posters and images are strong things to use, and can draw people across a room to you and your book. This means your images (especially book covers) need to capture the genre well.
Tim Baker:  I don’t think it does. I am not marketing my genre – I am marketing my books to anybody who can read – as I’m sure other authors do as well. I understand that all genres have a core audience, but those people will be there regardless of your marketing techniques. It’s the rest of the people we should all be trying to reach.
Cynthia Vespia: Marketing and promotion is very specific for each genre and that’s due to the readership. I feel as though romance and erotica have a really large readership, where some other genres may not be as large. For example westerns aren’t that popular any more so if that’s the genre you’re writing in then it might feel a little tougher. Because I write in the fantasy realm alot I found I can cross-promote with alot of commercial vehicles such as different conventions, movie/TV tie-ins, etc.
Janet Garber: Journalism is easy in comparison to other genres. You get an assignment to do an interview or column or essay, submit it on the deadline and usually see it published very soon afterward. At that point you let your fans know the article has come out. All other genres: it’s a question of experimenting with getting the word out on your website, blog, facebook, etc., running ads perhaps, doing book signings and readings in bookstores and libraries. It’s trial and error until you figure out what works.
Margareth Stewart: Oh, places may vary, but strategies remain the same – creating connection to all possible readers. Different readers are found at different places – we have to search for them. A good example is what I did for “Open/Pierre´s journey after war”. I sent book release and marketing material to WWII discussion groups in the internet. I also placed articles about it in War Blogs and I still keep constantly trying to find people who are interested in WWII. We – writers – have to develop the ability to create connections with people who are related to our topics and genres (all the time).
Dark Fantasy.Western Steampunk

Dark Fantasy and Western Steampunk

If you write in more than one genre, what do you do with your marketing to tap into the different audiences?
Janet Garber: Since I used to be a serious person, a business and career writer, and still am occasionally, I attend annual conferences in my field, contribute to LinkedIn, try to network a bit with other professionals. I will have a new novel coming out which is not humorous, not about HR or the corporate world and I’m wondering just how I will promote it. It definitely falls into the Women’s Fiction rubrique and thematically ties into some of the stories I have written and published. I hope I get some brainstorms about how to promote it when it’s ready for publication!
One of the biggest pieces of advice I hear as far as genres go is to read everything you can get your hands on in the genre you’re planning to write. This, not only helps you to know the tropes for your genre, but also makes you familiar with what is already out there. It doesn’t seem like genre makes a lot of difference when it comes to the writing process, but it does affect the types and amounts of research we must do, and the markets we aim advertising efforts toward. Be sure and drop in next Monday when our panel members will discuss the business end of writing. It should be a great segment, so don’t miss it.
 

If you have a question you’ve always wanted answered, but it’s not covered in the post on that topic, or if our panel’s answers have stirred new questions within you, pose your query in the comments. Make note if it is directed toward a specific author. Questions will be directed to the general panel unless otherwise specified. Then, in the final post for the series, I will present your questions and the responses I recieved from panel members.

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There’s No Escaping Hell For “Hell’s Butcher”

Hells Butcher Series

I had the pleasure of reading the Hell’s Butcher series by Chris Barili, Hell’s Marshal and Hell’s Butcher. This series is refreshingly different, a combination of western, speculative fiction and super hero, and somehow, it all works.

Frank Butcher has been appointed Hell’s Marshal, sent back to the land of the living on the trail of killers escaped from hell, bent on wrecking havoc and changing history to aide in the rise of the south. In Hell’s Marshal, Frank and his posse of walking dad and their coyote guide are after the renegade soul of Jesse James before he can revive the confederacy and rise up once more against the union.

They travel on a stage pulled by hell’s steeds, which never tire and move at incredible speeds, and they carry weapons with the power to send souls back to hell, where they belong. But, it isn’t easy to pursue their prey in bodies that have been dead a long time, causing extra difficulties to the chase. The coach is driven by a mortal man with special gifts and they’re joined by an orphan boy with the power to see souls raised from the fiery pit.

In Hell’s Butcher, John Wilkes Booth is the renegade soul, back to build an army to finish the government takeover, the conspiracy around the assassination failed to complete, and Frank and his posse must send them back. In a chase filled with misdirection, and battles with demonic souls inhabiting living bodies, there is no way to triumph without further damning the posse members’ souls.

************************************Spoiler Below*********************************

I absolutely love these story lines and must say these books are well crafted. Barili does a smash up job of drawing the reader into his world, where condemned souls can walk among the living. My only problem with these books is the fact that Frank doesn’t seem to change much. Guilt and self-loathing are Frank’s fatal flaws as the protagonist, and although it doesn’t necessarily be resolved, there should at least be some evident change by the end of each story arc.  Even by the end of the second book, although he reasons that people should not have to suffer for things they’ve done due to circumstances beyond their control, yet he still resigns himself to whatever punishment the judges dole out, feeling he deserves it, unable to apply the lesson to his own situation, and he is unable to forgive himself.

*******************************************************************************

Both books in this series, Hell’s Marshal and Hell’s Butcher are entertaining tales with refreshingly original story lines. Each book could be stand alone stories. Regardless of the one glitch found in the protagonist’s character arc, they are fun reads that keep the pages turning. I give them both four quills.

Four Quills3

GuiltyIf you like the Hell’s Butcher series as much as I did, you’ll want to be sure and grab the prequel, Guilty, which is now also available. Guilty tells the story the events in Frank’s life that brought him before the judges and put him in the position to serve as Hell’s Marshal. This book offers insight into Frank’s character, so we can see where all that self-loathing comes from, drawing the series together and giving it cohesion. It is a different, but wonderfully entertaining story line. I give Guilty five quills.

Five Quills3

 

 

 

Kaye Lynne Booth does honest book reviews on Writing to be Read in exchange for ARCs at no charge. Have a book you’d like reviewed? Contact Kaye at kayebooth(at)yahoo(dot)com.


A Published Author At Last – Now It’s In My Readers’ Hands

Delilah Cover

The exciting news this week is, Delilah is now available in digital format! It’s something I’ve been waiting for for quite a while, so of course, I am ecstatic. But, something many aspiring authors may not realize is that publication isn’t the end of the road. No, it’s actually just the beginning of a new chapter in the book of writing, this one titled Sell that Book.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with my road to publication, I started Delilah back in 2012, when I entered the M.F.A. in Creative Writing program at Western State Colorado University. The assignment given by my instructor, Russell Davis, was to write an excerpt in a genre outside our comfort zone. I was assigned to write in western genre, and low and behold, I found not only am I good at it, but I like writing western. Four years later, that small excerpt, grew into a 60,000 word western novel which I’ve been trying to find a publisher for over the past year.

You see, writing the book, while a great accomplishment unto itself, is only half the battle. It doesn’t do any good to write a story, if no one ever reads it. In order for that to happen, the book must be published, and while I could self-publish, (I had considered it), I held out hope of finding a publisher, and in the end my persistence paid off.

So, now that I got Delilah published, with the help of Dusty Saddles Publishing, I must get the word out through marketing and promotion. I must get people to read, and maybe more important, write reviews.

Reviews are where it’s at these days. According to Amazon, reviews are how you get your book promoted, and I just read somewhere that Amazon has recently increased the number of reviews needed for them to promote your book, from thirty-five to fifty or one hundred.

The question is, where do I get reviews from? Although I do honest reviews here, on Writing to be Read, I don’t know many other bloggers who do. So, it comes down to appealing to you, my readers, to buy Delilah, read it and then go onto Amazon and Goodreads, (Delilah will be listed there soon -another thing I still need to do), and leave a review.

If you are willing to go to the trouble of doing all that, I thank you, but I also ask that you leave a review that is honest. While I would love you to leave a review which sings Delilah’s praises, I want it only if it is heartfelt. If you see problems with my story, I need to know what they are, in order to improve my writing of future books, so I am asking for honest criticism, if you are kind enough to leave a review at all.

In the end, it’s up to you, the reader, how successful Delilah, or any book, will be. So, buy the books you want to read, (which I hope includes my debut novel), and be kind. Leave an honest review.

 

Kaye Lynne Booth does honest book reviews on Writing to be Read in exchange for ARCs at no charge. Have a book you’d like reviewed? Contact Kaye at kayebooth(at)yahoo(dot)com.

 

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How Do You Measure Success?

Picture 979J

There are many measures of success, especially in writing. Readers may look at whether or not an author has made any of the best seller lists. Authors may look at the number of books published, or number of sales, or even positive reviews. For rising authors, who are trying to get a foot in the door, like me, finding a publisher willing to publish even one of your books may be all that is required to consider yourself a successful. That’s where I’m at right now, as I just signed a contract for my western novel Delilah. But the point is, that success is subjective and there are many different levels involved.

You can see what I mean. My little contract for Delilah wouldn’t be a big deal for someone like Stephen King or Anne Rice, who sell books faster than they can write them, but for little old me, it’s a very big deal, even though it isn’t with one of the big five major publishers and there is no advance that comes with it. Although those things would be nice, signing with my small independent publisher, Dusty Saddles, makes me feel plenty successful.

What’s great too, is that it doesn’t end there, because of those different levels I was talking about. Sure, I feel successful now, with book contract in hand. But, I also have a feeling of success when I check my blog stats and discover that my readers are increasing. I feel it every time one of my poems, or short stories is published. I felt it when I earned my M.F.A. in Creative Writing. I’ve no doubt I’ll feel it again if Delilah starts selling copies and I find people are reading it, or when the next book contract comes along, or if I sell a screenplay.

Success is what we, as writers, all strive for, although your definition of success may be just finishing the book. That was my definition while I was earning my M.F.A. in Creative Writing, but after completing two novels, working on both simultaneously, I know I can finish a book, so I’ve moved on to the next challenge. Selling the book, and now it looks like I have achieved that success, as well.

But we have to be careful not to want that success so bad that we allow ourselves to be taken. There are a lot of scammers out there, who will try to steal your book right out from under you. Although I was excited about being offered a contract, I didn’t just jump into heart first, but used my head and went over it with a magnifying glass, being on the look out for all the fine print. I questioned different clauses and negotiated on any that didn’t serve my best interests, until the publisher and I came to an agreement that was fair and served both our interests. Although having a knowledgeable attorney or agent look over all contracts is always recommended, as a striving artist, I had no access to that type of professionals, but I did have someone knowledgeable in the business look it over. He confirmed that I was reading it correctly and helped my identify a couple of problems with it. Fortunately, none of them were deal breakers and the publisher was willing to be flexible.

Now, I’m ready to embark on a new publishing adventure and looking forward to in anticipation. Signing the contract holds a certain level of success for me, but the next level of success may be just over the hill, so I must press forward. My readers can help by buying the book, because the ultimate goal for me is for people to read what I write, (and the money from the book sales will be nice, too). Of course, I’ll keep you updated as to when it will be out. After all, I strive to create Writing to be Read.

How do you measure your success?

 

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Ah! Sweet Rejection

rejected

Last week, I received a rejection letter for Delilah from a publishing house I submitted to back in October. Although I know it sounds odd, I was elated. “Why?” you may be asking, and with good reason. Rejections are not something writers are usually pleased about. In fact, just the opposite. But I was pleased with this rejection letter for one reason. It was not a form letter. In fact, the editor took the time not only to read the sample I submitted, but to give me constructive criticism and suggestions as to how the manuscript might be improved.

As a graduate student, my professors drilled the idea into our heads that a personal rejection letter, means your manuscript made it past the slush pile and actually received some attention from the editor. It was good enough that they actually read what you sent. And a rejection letter with personal feedback is even better, because then you don’t have to wonder why they rejected your work, and you can strive to fix anything that needs fixing before sending it out again.

Writing Process 2

thumbs-down

My rejection letter was personal, rather than form, and it offered feedback. How sweet is that? I mean, I’m not happy the book was rejected, but I am happy that somebody read at least part of it, in this case, the first fifty pages. My reaction to this rejection is to study the personal feedback and then really look at the manuscript to determine the validity of the comments. Then revise and resubmit to the next publisher on my list for Delilah.

 

For those not familiar with me or my writing, Delilah is my 60,000 word western novel about a strong willed young woman, who served two years in the Colorado Territorial Prison, in the late 1880s. Delilah thought that time had hardened her against the cruelties of the world, but she wasn’t prepared for the trip back home and the hardships of the Colorado frontier. She heads to her home in San Luis, with sixteen year old, Sarah. An encounter with two outlaws, who take the girl captive, sets Delilah on a journey into the high country of Colorado mining towns. Along the way she faces wild animals, outlaws and Indians, makes colorful friends, and learns to love again. Delilah is a novel with the true flavor of the Colorado frontier.

A while back, I also had a hybrid publisher, who expressed interest, but wanted me to provide other western authors that would be interested in publishing with them. (To get a better idea of what I’m talking about when I say hybrid publishing, see my article, Hybrid Publishers – What are they all about?). I posted in a few places on Facebook, but did not come up with any other interested authors.

So, this is actually the second personal, (non-form) letter that I’ve received on Delilah. Of course, it would have been better if I had received an acceptance letter, but I believe in myself, I believe in my writing, and I know that one day, that acceptance letter will come. And, if not, I am not beyond the idea of publishing her myself, because I know she is that good.

To learn more about and read updates on Delilah, go to my Delilah Facebook page.

 

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What’s a Nice Girl Like Me Doing Writing in a Genre Like This?

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I recently sold I Had to Do It, a flash fiction story of the western flavor, to Zetetic: A Record of Unusual Inquiry. And of course, my regular readers know I’ve written a western novel, Delilah, as well, for which I’m diligently seeking a publisher at present. It might seem that I am leaning toward becoming a western writer, and I’ll admit, I do enjoy writing western.

But I’m an eclectic kind of gal by nature. My palate savors many cuisines, although I’m partial to Oriental and Latino foods. I listen to various genres of music, being heavy on the rock, but also enjoying metal, hip hop, country, pop, and even classical. I watch a wide range of movie genres, as well. On that same note, I read most of the genres, and seek opportunities to try genres that are new to me, but horror has always been my favorite. In fact, in 2012, when I began my M.F.A. in Creative Writing program at Western State Colorado University, western was one of the few genres which I hadn’t read.

In that first class, the first thing my instructor asked was, “In what genre do you usually write?” I considered the short stories I had written to date, many of which, I wasn’t sure what genre they fell into. The only experience I’d had with western was 850 words worth, I Had to Do It, and it hadn’t sold. But the idea was for us to write outside of our comfort zones, and western was the genre I was assigned for my first excerpt.

I’m not sure why I didn’t think I would like writing westerns. I’m a native of Colorado and proud of that, but I’ve never been a cowgirl per se. I enjoy western films. Clint Eastwood spaghetti westerns are the best, but Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, and The Quick and the Dead are right up there, too. But as I said, I hadn’t really read much in the western genre. But then, I wrote the excerpt for Delilah. After that first semester, revising my excerpt according to the feedback from my instructor and my cohorts, I started thinking that I might not be too bad at writing in the western genre. Three years and several rewrites later, Delilah is a story I’m rather proud of. The rejections do sting a bit, but I’m confident that if I endeavor to persevere and keep submitting it, eventually it will land with the right publisher, and it will be accepted. And if not, well, there’s always independent publishing. Delilah is a good story, and it’s well written, and I want very much to be able to share it with the world. One way or another, I will get the book published.

And yes, there will probably be other westerns in my future. I seem to have a knack for it, at least, so I’ve been told. I already have an idea for a western romance, although romance is another genre I never thought I’d find myself writing. I guess we’ll see.

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